Equipment Overview

Brand: 
Aerobie
field_vote: 
Equipment Type: 
Overview: 

The Aerobie Aeropress makes great coffee, cleans up easily and is a lot of fun to use. The coffee brewer delivers consistently smooth, rich flavor that’s comparable to French press coffee, but the micro-filter eliminates the grit that usually accompanies pressed coffee.

Purchase Area

Price: $25.95

Equipment Info

Aerobie’s Aeropress doesn’t look much like a coffee brewer, but it delivers one mean cup of coffee time after time. The cup-top coffee brewer was developed by Alan Adler, a toy inventor who was looking for a way to brew low-acid coffee that tastes great every time. He succeeded. The novel gadget has been called a gimmicky novelty, but those who try it tend to sing its praises loudly.

 

GRIT-FREE FRENCH PRESS FLAVOR

Like the French press, the Aeropress uses total immersion to extract full, rich flavor from coffee. Unlike the French press, the Aeropress filters out the grit so that the only thing that ends up in your cup is coffee, brewed perfectly every time.

 

FLEXIBILITY AND CONTROL

Because the Aeropress is manual, you get a full measure of control over the brewing process: water temperature, agitation and speed of filtering are all completely up to you. The three parts – cylinder, plunger and cap – fit together into a small, packable device that you can take with you anywhere, so you can brew perfect coffee anywhere you have access to boiling water.

 

ELEGANTLY SIMPLE, INTRIGUINGLY COMPLEX

The brewing concept behind the Aeropress is elegantly simple. You place a filter in the cap, attach the cap to the brewing cylinder, add your desired amount of ground coffee and hot water, stir, then press the plunger down to force the coffee through the micro-filter and into your mug. For those who like to play with their coffee, though, the Aeropress is obligingly fun to play with – what else would you expect from a coffee maker invented by a toy designer? Aeropress fans have come up with all sorts of finicky, fun techniques to tweak their brew. There’s even an annual World Aeropress Championship to crown the best Aeropress brewer in the world.

 

FEATURES

  • Practically foolproof. About the only way you can mess it up is to knock the press off the top of the cup
  • Fast coffee. Including the time it takes to heat your water, you’ll have coffee in about 5 minutes.
  • Smooth, rich flavor. The combination of total immersion and micro-filtering produces awesome coffee.
  • Portable. Take it with you anywhere without worrying about where to plug it in.
  • Unbreakable. The BPA-free plastic is tougher than your typical French press.

     

PROS:

  • Makes great coffee with little fuss
  • Easy cleanup – just pop out the puck and rinse the whole thing out.     
  • Fun and just nerdy enough to make you interesting.
  • Affordable. Very affordable, in fact, when you consider that you get about a year’s worth of Aeropress filters as part of the deal.

 

CONS:

  • You’ll need some elbow grease. It takes some muscle to push the plunger down.

 

Suggestions:  Able Disk Filter for the Aerobie Aeropress

Specs: 
Model: 80F08
Material: FDA-approved plastic
Dimensions:     4 x 5.5 in (H), stored
Main Product Image: 
Aerobie Aeropress Coffee Brewer Coffee Kind
Free Shipping: 
No

Comments

Submitted by jbviau on
Doesn't make true espresso, but *does* make delicious coffee. My favorite thing about this brewer is the experimenting/innovation it's inspired (see http://www.brewmethods.com/ for starters). There's a World Aeropress Championship. Need I say more? ;)
Your Rating: 
0

Submitted by donnedonne on
Affectionately called the HeroPress by some. I like this thing but I don't love it. My best Aeropress brews give me about as much satisfaction as an average pour-over. Pluses: really easy to make iced coffee with this, also good if you need a very small amount of coffee. Takes paper filters and you can also use a metal filter with it; Coava/Able makes the best version.
Your Rating: 
0

The Aeropress is cheap, speedy, highly transportable, easy to clean, and perfect to satisfy that just in time, right sized (1 to 4 espresso shot) caffeine fix. While this device competes fairly with a French press maker (sans sediment), it won’t be replacing my Delonghi Magnifica super automatic any time soon…
Your Rating: 
0

Submitted by speedstar on
Great to have for a quick single cup or when traveling. Not espresso but great coffee and simple to use and experiment with. For the price, you can't go wrong.
Your Rating: 
0

Submitted by QUESTER on
This makes a nice clean cup with lots of body, and it's impossible to mess up if you use water at the right temp. (A minute off boiling works well.) It is also incredibly easy to keep clean, since it cleans itself as you press down the coffee. That said, if you have a lot of coffee in there or some fine grind, it can require a great deal of force to plunge your cup.
Your Rating: 
0

Submitted by ryanls on
The AeroPress was one of the first manual brewers I invested in, and although it is not part of my daily ritual, I am always glad to have it in the cupboard as an alternative. - I would like to note that the AeroPress does not make "espresso" by most people's definition. It does, however, allow you to quickly make a small, concentrated cup of coffee. For many people, this is a good enough approximation of espresso. And indeed it can be really tasty. But a true espresso typically has crema, an emulsion of tiny gas bubbles and coffee oils. The AeroPress uses a paper filter and does not reach the same high pressure as an espresso machine, so the output is inherently different. - One thing I really like about the AeroPress is that you control the amount of pressure applied to the extraction, which allows a wider variety of grind sizes (and resulting flavor profiles). You can use a fine grind with a short extraction and hard push. Or you can use a medium grind, longer steep time, and gentle press (Google 'inverted aeropress' for a creative way to extend the steeping time). You can easily vary the ratio of coffee to water to achieve the strength you prefer. - All in all, a unique and cool gadget. Portable, practically unbreakable, easy to clean, and flexible in its brewing methods.
Your Rating: 
0

Submitted by billlyons on
I use the AeroPress to make coffee every morning and it makes the best coffee I have tried. I usually roast my own coffee beans and use the AeroPress to make Americano coffee. Takes a little more coffee but is never bitter (as long as you follow the directions). I have purchased several of these for friends and relatives.
Your Rating: 
0

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>Simple to use, durable, inexpensive, and capable of making excellent coffee with the right beans. This device is less finicky with regard to grind than many specialty products if you use the standard paper filters. If you have a decent grinder then a trimmed piece of felt or a perforated metal disc can substitute for a unique cup. The online community offers many methods for using this brewer and for the most part they work so getting a cup to suit your tastes is easy. Two thumbs up!
Your Rating: 
0

The aeropress claims to make espresso, and it does a really bad job at it. What it does a great job at is functioning as a pseudo french press for people who only have a blade grinder. Since it uses paper filters, you can just grind on your blade grinder until your coffee is very fine, which is the only way a blade grinder will get uniform grounds. I typically only make 1 cup of coffee each morning, and it works great for this. Using the inverted method, I can get much, much better cups of coffee than I can with any typical drip machine. When I can afford I burr grinder, I'll replace the aeropress with a regular french press, but until then, I'll use it almost every morning.
Your Rating: 
0

Submitted by infojules on
I love the aerobie! It's fun to make the coffee and I love seeing the rich brown liquid press through the vacuum tube. I add a little hot water and have a delicious Americano.
Your Rating: 
0

I am a huge evangelist for the Aeropress, and take it with me whenever I go traveling if I think I'll need to make my own coffee. Aside from the fact that the coffee it makes is delicious (and sediment-free, which I like, although French press fans might find it too smooth) it's also reasonably compact and basically cleans itself as you use it. The only downside is having to carry around the paper filters--they're not bulky, but it can be a pain to keep them clean and dry when one is, for example, camping. It does not make actual espresso, but it makes damn good coffee.
Your Rating: 
0

Submitted by Sarahh on
After hearing several people rave about it, I decided to test it out myself. It does a god job of making coffee, but as others have said it really doesn't make espresso. It's easy to use and clean so I'll keep it until I find something better.
Your Rating: 
0

scott's picture
Submitted by scott on
We've spoken with the folks at Aerobie about their use of the word "espresso" in the title, "AeroPress coffee and espresso maker." They explained that the AeroPress does use pressure to produce a delicious shot of intense coffee. It's good for a latte, a cappuccino, an americano, or other espresso based drinks. You won't get the thick crema like from a cafe's espresso machine pressing the coffee under 9 bar of pressure. But you won't get plain drip coffee either. You'll get something richer, than say. They further explained that they feel using the term "espresso" is important for communicating the capability to make all those drinks. They realize many people feel a drink should not be called espresso unless it is made with a certain amount of pressure. Ultimately what is important is what is in the cup, not how it got there, and you are getting a pretty unique brew that is stronger and more flavorful than traditional drip.
Your Rating: 
0

I just own the aeropress for a few day but already I like it a lot. But first and foremost, the advertisement is misleading, aeropress does not make espresso; it make great coffee but not espresso. It can make as strong a coffee as you want depending on the amount of ground coffee you use and the amount of water you use. Want differentiate aeropress coffee from espresso from a traditional espresso machine is oil and crema which are present in a properly made espresso. There are several advantages to the aeropress: -easy clean up, almost too easy if you compare to french press or other brewing methods -great portability-you can take to school, camping, work place...etc the possibility is endless! -did I say good good good tasting coffee already? -cheap! Pick one or two up and enjoy coffee anywhere!
Your Rating: 
0

Submitted by nekox38 on
This is what I make the vast majority of my coffee on. It does take a bit more prep than just pressing a button, but it makes some of the best coffee I've had. You can also use the coffee concentrate it produces to make lattes/mochas/etc. It's not technically expresso, but it does taste good. The major cons of it are that you can usually make only one cup per time and you tend to use more coffee than with more conventional methods.
Your Rating: 
0

This is a pretty neat device. I'm using it now as my preferred single-cup "work coffee maker", moving from a french press and/or K-cup. I'm very pleased with the coffee it makes, especially for being as simple and quick as it is. The reactions I get from coworkers at the coffee station are priceless, too - I make my coffee right next to the industrial coffee maker for the floor because that's where the hot water is. I mostly get -- aside from puzzled looks -- "is that an espresso maker?". Which then leads to the "not really. . .and here's why" discussion. My very favorite reaction the first day i had the AeroPress was, "Uh, is that a bong?" Ha! Recommended. -sb
Your Rating: 
0

Submitted by yeahyeah on
This is one of the best bang for your buck coffee purchases. I expect it to last quite some time and it is capable of producing some excellent coffee.
Your Rating: 
0
  • Aerobie Aeropress Coffee Brewer Coffee Kind

    AeroPress Espresso and Coffee Maker

    4.5
    Brand Aerobie
    Equipment Type Coffee Maker, Immersion

    Overview

    The Aerobie Aeropress makes great coffee, cleans up easily and is a lot of fun to use. The coffee brewer delivers consistently smooth, rich flavor that’s comparable to French press coffee, but the micro-filter eliminates the grit that usually accompanies pressed coffee.

    $25.95

    Coffee Kind Promise

    • Roasted to order
    • Price match
    • Safe & Secure

    Description

    Aerobie’s Aeropress doesn’t look much like a coffee brewer, but it delivers one mean cup of coffee time after time. The cup-top coffee brewer was developed by Alan Adler, a toy inventor who was looking for a way to brew low-acid coffee that tastes great every time. He succeeded. The novel gadget has been called a gimmicky novelty, but those who try it tend to sing its praises loudly.

     

    GRIT-FREE FRENCH PRESS FLAVOR

    Like the French press, the Aeropress uses total immersion to extract full, rich flavor from coffee. Unlike the French press, the Aeropress filters out the grit so that the only thing that ends up in your cup is coffee, brewed perfectly every time.

     

    FLEXIBILITY AND CONTROL

    Because the Aeropress is manual, you get a full measure of control over the brewing process: water temperature, agitation and speed of filtering are all completely up to you. The three parts – cylinder, plunger and cap – fit together into a small, packable device that you can take with you anywhere, so you can brew perfect coffee anywhere you have access to boiling water.

     

    ELEGANTLY SIMPLE, INTRIGUINGLY COMPLEX

    The brewing concept behind the Aeropress is elegantly simple. You place a filter in the cap, attach the cap to the brewing cylinder, add your desired amount of ground coffee and hot water, stir, then press the plunger down to force the coffee through the micro-filter and into your mug. For those who like to play with their coffee, though, the Aeropress is obligingly fun to play with – what else would you expect from a coffee maker invented by a toy designer? Aeropress fans have come up with all sorts of finicky, fun techniques to tweak their brew. There’s even an annual World Aeropress Championship to crown the best Aeropress brewer in the world.

     

    FEATURES

    • Practically foolproof. About the only way you can mess it up is to knock the press off the top of the cup
    • Fast coffee. Including the time it takes to heat your water, you’ll have coffee in about 5 minutes.
    • Smooth, rich flavor. The combination of total immersion and micro-filtering produces awesome coffee.
    • Portable. Take it with you anywhere without worrying about where to plug it in.
    • Unbreakable. The BPA-free plastic is tougher than your typical French press.

         

    PROS:

    • Makes great coffee with little fuss
    • Easy cleanup – just pop out the puck and rinse the whole thing out.     
    • Fun and just nerdy enough to make you interesting.
    • Affordable. Very affordable, in fact, when you consider that you get about a year’s worth of Aeropress filters as part of the deal.

     

    CONS:

    • You’ll need some elbow grease. It takes some muscle to push the plunger down.

     

    Suggestions:  Able Disk Filter for the Aerobie Aeropress

    Reviews

    Login or Sign Up to Comment
    AeroPress Espresso and Coffee Maker Aerobie
    Rated 4.5294117647059/5 based on 17 customer reviews
    $25.95 In stock

    The Aerobie Aeropress makes great coffee, cleans up easily and is a lot of fun to use. The coffee brewer delivers consistently smooth, rich flavor that’s comparable to French press coffee, but the micro-filter eliminates the grit that usually accompanies pressed coffee.

    5/ 5stars
    5

    Aeropress

    This is one of the best bang for your buck coffee purchases. I expect it to last quite some time and it is capable of producing some excellent coffee.
    5/ 5stars
    5

    AeroPress is the deal

    This is a pretty neat device. I'm using it now as my preferred single-cup "work coffee maker", moving from a french press and/or K-cup. I'm very pleased with the coffee it makes, especially for being as simple and quick as it is. The reactions I get from coworkers at the coffee station are priceless, too - I make my coffee right next to the industrial coffee maker for the floor because that's where the hot water is. I mostly get -- aside from puzzled looks -- "is that an espresso maker?". Which then leads to the "not really. . .and here's why" discussion. My very favorite reaction the first day i had the AeroPress was, "Uh, is that a bong?" Ha! Recommended. -sb
    5/ 5stars
    5

    AeroPress Espresso and Coffee Maker

    This is what I make the vast majority of my coffee on. It does take a bit more prep than just pressing a button, but it makes some of the best coffee I've had. You can also use the coffee concentrate it produces to make lattes/mochas/etc. It's not technically expresso, but it does taste good. The major cons of it are that you can usually make only one cup per time and you tend to use more coffee than with more conventional methods.
    5/ 5stars
    5

    awsome coffee maker; not an espresso maker

    I just own the aeropress for a few day but already I like it a lot. But first and foremost, the advertisement is misleading, aeropress does not make espresso; it make great coffee but not espresso. It can make as strong a coffee as you want depending on the amount of ground coffee you use and the amount of water you use. Want differentiate aeropress coffee from espresso from a traditional espresso machine is oil and crema which are present in a properly made espresso. There are several advantages to the aeropress: -easy clean up, almost too easy if you compare to french press or other brewing methods -great portability-you can take to school, camping, work place...etc the possibility is endless! -did I say good good good tasting coffee already? -cheap! Pick one or two up and enjoy coffee anywhere!
    5/ 5stars
    5

    We've spoken with the folks at Aerobie about the word "Espresso"

    We've spoken with the folks at Aerobie about their use of the word "espresso" in the title, "AeroPress coffee and espresso maker." They explained that the AeroPress does use pressure to produce a delicious shot of intense coffee. It's good for a latte, a cappuccino, an americano, or other espresso based drinks. You won't get the thick crema like from a cafe's espresso machine pressing the coffee under 9 bar of pressure. But you won't get plain drip coffee either. You'll get something richer, than say. They further explained that they feel using the term "espresso" is important for communicating the capability to make all those drinks. They realize many people feel a drink should not be called espresso unless it is made with a certain amount of pressure. Ultimately what is important is what is in the cup, not how it got there, and you are getting a pretty unique brew that is stronger and more flavorful than traditional drip.
    4/ 5stars
    4

    decent

    After hearing several people rave about it, I decided to test it out myself. It does a god job of making coffee, but as others have said it really doesn't make espresso. It's easy to use and clean so I'll keep it until I find something better.
    5/ 5stars
    5

    Smooth strong coffee from an easy to clean, lightweight package

    I am a huge evangelist for the Aeropress, and take it with me whenever I go traveling if I think I'll need to make my own coffee. Aside from the fact that the coffee it makes is delicious (and sediment-free, which I like, although French press fans might find it too smooth) it's also reasonably compact and basically cleans itself as you use it. The only downside is having to carry around the paper filters--they're not bulky, but it can be a pain to keep them clean and dry when one is, for example, camping. It does not make actual espresso, but it makes damn good coffee.
    5/ 5stars
    5

    AeroPress

    I love the aerobie! It's fun to make the coffee and I love seeing the rich brown liquid press through the vacuum tube. I add a little hot water and have a delicious Americano.
    4/ 5stars
    4

    The aeropress claims to make

    The aeropress claims to make espresso, and it does a really bad job at it. What it does a great job at is functioning as a pseudo french press for people who only have a blade grinder. Since it uses paper filters, you can just grind on your blade grinder until your coffee is very fine, which is the only way a blade grinder will get uniform grounds. I typically only make 1 cup of coffee each morning, and it works great for this. Using the inverted method, I can get much, much better cups of coffee than I can with any typical drip machine. When I can afford I burr grinder, I'll replace the aeropress with a regular french press, but until then, I'll use it almost every morning.
    5/ 5stars
    5

    Take the plunge - you will be glad you did!


    Simple to use, durable, inexpensive, and capable of making excellent coffee with the right beans. This device is less finicky with regard to grind than many specialty products if you use the standard paper filters. If you have a decent grinder then a trimmed piece of felt or a perforated metal disc can substitute for a unique cup. The online community offers many methods for using this brewer and for the most part they work so getting a cup to suit your tastes is easy. Two thumbs up!
    5/ 5stars
    5

    Aeropress

    I use the AeroPress to make coffee every morning and it makes the best coffee I have tried. I usually roast my own coffee beans and use the AeroPress to make Americano coffee. Takes a little more coffee but is never bitter (as long as you follow the directions). I have purchased several of these for friends and relatives.
    4/ 5stars
    4

    Unique manual brewer

    The AeroPress was one of the first manual brewers I invested in, and although it is not part of my daily ritual, I am always glad to have it in the cupboard as an alternative. - I would like to note that the AeroPress does not make "espresso" by most people's definition. It does, however, allow you to quickly make a small, concentrated cup of coffee. For many people, this is a good enough approximation of espresso. And indeed it can be really tasty. But a true espresso typically has crema, an emulsion of tiny gas bubbles and coffee oils. The AeroPress uses a paper filter and does not reach the same high pressure as an espresso machine, so the output is inherently different. - One thing I really like about the AeroPress is that you control the amount of pressure applied to the extraction, which allows a wider variety of grind sizes (and resulting flavor profiles). You can use a fine grind with a short extraction and hard push. Or you can use a medium grind, longer steep time, and gentle press (Google 'inverted aeropress' for a creative way to extend the steeping time). You can easily vary the ratio of coffee to water to achieve the strength you prefer. - All in all, a unique and cool gadget. Portable, practically unbreakable, easy to clean, and flexible in its brewing methods.
    4/ 5stars
    4

    Makes a nice, clean cup with lots of body

    This makes a nice clean cup with lots of body, and it's impossible to mess up if you use water at the right temp. (A minute off boiling works well.) It is also incredibly easy to keep clean, since it cleans itself as you press down the coffee. That said, if you have a lot of coffee in there or some fine grind, it can require a great deal of force to plunge your cup.
    4/ 5stars
    4

    Great for single cup and travel

    Great to have for a quick single cup or when traveling. Not espresso but great coffee and simple to use and experiment with. For the price, you can't go wrong.
    3/ 5stars
    3

    Simple gizmo does the job

    The Aeropress is cheap, speedy, highly transportable, easy to clean, and perfect to satisfy that just in time, right sized (1 to 4 espresso shot) caffeine fix. While this device competes fairly with a French press maker (sans sediment), it won’t be replacing my Delonghi Magnifica super automatic any time soon…
    4/ 5stars
    4

    Aeropress

    Affectionately called the HeroPress by some. I like this thing but I don't love it. My best Aeropress brews give me about as much satisfaction as an average pour-over. Pluses: really easy to make iced coffee with this, also good if you need a very small amount of coffee. Takes paper filters and you can also use a metal filter with it; Coava/Able makes the best version.
    5/ 5stars
    5

    Absolutely worth a try

    Doesn't make true espresso, but *does* make delicious coffee. My favorite thing about this brewer is the experimenting/innovation it's inspired (see http://www.brewmethods.com/ for starters). There's a World Aeropress Championship. Need I say more? ;)

    Specs

    Model: 80F08
    Material: FDA-approved plastic
    Dimensions:     4 x 5.5 in (H), stored

    Brand Info

    For more than 20 years, Aerobie, Inc. was known as Superflight, Inc. They’re famous for making awesomely different and wonderfully aerodynamically balanced flying disks known as Aerobies, Squidgie balls and rocket-finned footballs. So how does a toy and sports company become one of the most surprising big hits in the specialty coffee world? 

     

    It all started with an owner who loves good coffee, but can’t deal with acid. Alan Adler, inventor of the aforementioned throwing and flying thing, turned his attention and scientific know-how to creating a device that would brew incredibly good coffee that would not make his tummy unhappy. The result was the Aerobie Aeropress, one of the most innovative coffee brewing devices ever to capture the attention of the coffee loving public.

     

    And capture attention it has. Since the Aeropress’ introduction in 2005—coincidentally, just about the time the company changed its name from Superflight to Aerobie—the manual coffee and espresso maker has built a fanatical following of coffee lovers that swear they won’t drink coffee brewed any other way. Originally billed as a convenient alternative to bulkier, pricier coffee makers especially for travelers, the Aeropress has made its way into the kitchen and the coffee shop and even inspired a World Aeropress Championship.

     

    The Aeropress is deceptively simple. It consists of a brewing chamber, a seal, a plunger, and a filter cap that holds a disposable microfilter. It brews impeccable coffee in just about 30 seconds, and offers enough versatility that its fans have heated discussions about the various methods of extracting the very best flavor from coffee using the Aeropress.

     

    Aerobie offers the Aeropress and replacement filters, in addition to a variety of flying disks and sports toys for playful coffee lovers to enjoy.