I have been following a thread discussing barley espresso.  The thread has devolved into some mean spirited commentary but the original poster did expand my horizons. I never had a clue this even existed as a beverage let alone a coffee alternative. After a fair amount of bickering if it even deserved to be called espresso of any kind (which never was fully resolved) most agree this is not really espresso. A beverage, yes, but not true espresso. Apparently the idea is an old one since during World War Two the Germans used roasted grain to stretch thin coffee supplies or replace expired coffee supplies all together.  One post did find this quote from a blog about barley espresso: 

"Why do Italians love Barley Espresso? First, there is a long list of health benefits to drinking Barley Espresso. But I discovered another cause as I spoke with our limousine driver on our return trip to the airport. Italians often enjoy Espresso socially which leads to consuming a lot of Espresso! Our limo driver said that at a certain point, he has to give up the espresso shots and switch to a shot of Barley Espresso. Since in Italian society it would be an offense to refuse the invitation to drink espresso together, Barley Espresso provides a healthy way to remain social. The barley espresso is the newest addition to the healthy lifestyle in Italy."

So this popularity is due to the lack of caffeine and the ability to drink shots late into the evening so as not to appear rude.  I do not see much in the way of commentary with regard to taste for this brew so until someone I trust pony's up eight bucks plus shipping to pick up a sack of this roasted grain and posts that it tastes great, good or even passable, I will just wait with rising anticipation in hopes that somebody loaves it....

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Comments

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>I think this is a great idea - I wonder how it will turn out? I hope you post about it if you end up trying this out!

Submitted by jbviau on
Right, let's see how it tastes! Discussions about whether or not something is "truly espresso" never fail to irritate me.

Submitted by yeahyeah on
That is interesting. I'd never even heard of such a thing but I am curious to see how it turns out.

It would be interesting to know how this would taste, and would like to try it as well. Interesting that this would be considered a substitute.

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>I agree - the taste is everything and I am excited to try this - I am seriously considering ordering a bag.

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>I am curious too - I admit I was (and probably still am a little bit) skeptical but I am keeping my mind open.

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>If barley is roasted properly so the sugars caramelize then it should bear some resemblance to a sweet espresso shot - I hope.

Thanks for sharing this!I have not seen barley espresso so far in my life. It would be really interesting to try it.

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>That is how I feel too - i might like it, I might hate it, but I will never know until I try it - might order a bag for kicks.

Submitted by wakeknot on
if it has any adverse affect on the grinder. Do you need a dedicated grinder for it?

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>I have a feeling this is hard on a regular coffee grinder but I am not sure - grain mills are usually more expensive.

Barley espresso - is it still espresso?

| by

I have been following a thread discussing barley espresso.  The thread has devolved into some mean spirited commentary but the original poster did expand my horizons. I never had a clue this even existed as a beverage let alone a coffee alternative. After a fair amount of bickering if it even deserved to be called espresso of any kind (which never was fully resolved) most agree this is not really espresso. A beverage, yes, but not true espresso. Apparently the idea is an old one since during World War Two the Germans used roasted grain to stretch thin coffee supplies or replace expired coffee supplies all together.  One post did find this quote from a blog about barley espresso: 

"Why do Italians love Barley Espresso? First, there is a long list of health benefits to drinking Barley Espresso. But I discovered another cause as I spoke with our limousine driver on our return trip to the airport. Italians often enjoy Espresso socially which leads to consuming a lot of Espresso! Our limo driver said that at a certain point, he has to give up the espresso shots and switch to a shot of Barley Espresso. Since in Italian society it would be an offense to refuse the invitation to drink espresso together, Barley Espresso provides a healthy way to remain social. The barley espresso is the newest addition to the healthy lifestyle in Italy."

So this popularity is due to the lack of caffeine and the ability to drink shots late into the evening so as not to appear rude.  I do not see much in the way of commentary with regard to taste for this brew so until someone I trust pony's up eight bucks plus shipping to pick up a sack of this roasted grain and posts that it tastes great, good or even passable, I will just wait with rising anticipation in hopes that somebody loaves it....

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I have a feeling this is

January 7, 2012 | by EricBNC


I have a feeling this is hard on a regular coffee grinder but I am not sure - grain mills are usually more expensive.

I wonder

January 6, 2012 | by wakeknot

if it has any adverse affect on the grinder. Do you need a dedicated grinder for it?

@sam

December 22, 2011 | by EricBNC


That is how I feel too - i might like it, I might hate it, but I will never know until I try it - might order a bag for kicks.

Interesting

December 18, 2011 | by samuellaw178

Thanks for sharing this!I have not seen barley espresso so far in my life. It would be really interesting to try it.

@intrepid510

December 17, 2011 | by EricBNC


If barley is roasted properly so the sugars caramelize then it should bear some resemblance to a sweet espresso shot - I hope.

@yeahyeah

December 17, 2011 | by EricBNC


I am curious too - I admit I was (and probably still am a little bit) skeptical but I am keeping my mind open.

@jbviau

December 17, 2011 | by EricBNC


I agree - the taste is everything and I am excited to try this - I am seriously considering ordering a bag.

It would be interesting to

December 17, 2011 | by intrepid510

It would be interesting to know how this would taste, and would like to try it as well. Interesting that this would be considered a substitute.

Barley

December 17, 2011 | by yeahyeah

That is interesting. I'd never even heard of such a thing but I am curious to see how it turns out.

Curious

December 17, 2011 | by jbviau

Right, let's see how it tastes! Discussions about whether or not something is "truly espresso" never fail to irritate me.

Please!

December 16, 2011 | by EricBNC


I think this is a great idea - I wonder how it will turn out? I hope you post about it if you end up trying this out!

you give me an idea!

December 16, 2011 | by sontondaman

perhaps I can roast this up in my roaster and be a guinea pig and test to see how it taste like?

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