I have been experimenting with the syphon coffee maker in the past two week (http://www.roaste.com/CoffeeBlogs/sontondaman/My-Approach-Siphon-Coffee-... ) or so and I think I might have reached a little road block or so. In the first few tries or so, I made relatively mediocere coffee, no where near the quality I would expect from such a hyped brew method. I made several modifications to my method for instance  I grind courser and I minimize any kind of ground agitation. I only use the plastic spoon that is included with the siphon brewer to gently fold the grind in so that it is saturated with water; the rest, I let the bubbling of the water do the job. 

 

This morning, I made another pot of Yama siphon coffee from my very freshly roasted (2 day after roast!) Tarzanian Peaberry and I was expecting a phenomenal cup because these beans are very good. However, I was a little sad that the coffee did not turn out as good. The cup has good aroma but the taste was a little bitter so I'm thinking that the coffee was over extracted a little bit. I did leave the Yama to brew the coffee for 75 seconds so perhaps I should decrease this time amount to 60 second next time.

 

The thing that is bothering me is the Baratza Vario which I'm using to grind the coffee is at it coursest setting right now. However, the coffee does not look anywhere near as course as I want. The thing about the Baratza Vario is that you can calibrate it pretty easily so that it can grind courser however, that would mean that you won't be able to grind fine for espresso. For a grinder that is advertise to be versatile as to be able to switch between different brewing method, this is rather unacceptable. I will probably need to contact Baratza to see if they have any solution for this. What I'm thinking is if I was to be able to grind a little courser, I would still be able to use a longer time for the siphon brewer and still do not get over-extraction. In the meanwhile, I might have to break out he Capresso Infinity to do the grinding for siphon.   

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Comments

Submitted by avaserfi on
My Vario arrives tomorrow. I hope you update us on the solution to your problem. Right now I don't have a syphon, but who knows what will happen next!

I'm not sure I'd advise trying to lengthen the brew time of a vac pot. You lose quite a lot of heat the longer the slurry is up North, so aiming for about a 2:00 steep time is about where you want to be. The tiny heat sources that go along with most vac pots can't do much about heat loss over longer periods of time. As for the Vario, it may be a full-range grinder, but you're right, there needs to be some calibration in between. This is because it's a home, not commercial, grinder. Typical use cases at home are not varied in application, so ideally you're setting to one calibration and keeping it there. Still, my Vario, calibrated for espresso, can produce a grind satisfactory for french press as well. You'll get more fines as your go coarser, but that's a factor of having smaller flat burrs - one of those setbacks shared by every grinder in the class.

I would think about the method you are using for the syphon, this is what James Hoffman said about the syphon on his blog about a week ago, " the syphon. I find it odd that the temperature profile of this brewer isn’t discussed more. It is rare to brew coffee in an environment where the temperature is held stable across a period of 1 to 4 minutes, as we usually do not add any energy beyond the brewing water to the brew. Many people dislike the taste, or are simply disappointed by, the taste of coffee from a syphon. Some might argue that this is because the person brewing lacks the particular ridiculous ninja stirring skills, but more likely the temperature profile of the brew is what is making it stand apart."

I probably will not lengthen the brewing as it is already being over-extracted, my siphon is a stove top so heat loss is not a problem.

Submitted by jbviau on
Comments like this make me feel as if I made the right choice in going with the Preciso over the Vario. My ideal press grind setting on the Preciso so far is 34F (out of 40). Hope you find a solution!

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>since the grinder does not use a traditional threaded collar to increase the burr gap calibration is the realistic option.

Submitted by wakeknot on
I tend to just use my Vario for espresso, but I may have to test it to see how it does on the coarse side of things while still calibrated for espresso.

yeah, I hope I can find a solution without doing calibration every time I switch grind setting. Hopefully I won't need to buy a separate grinder from drip.

Does the Baratza Vario grinds course enough?

| by

I have been experimenting with the syphon coffee maker in the past two week (http://www.roaste.com/CoffeeBlogs/sontondaman/My-Approach-Siphon-Coffee-... ) or so and I think I might have reached a little road block or so. In the first few tries or so, I made relatively mediocere coffee, no where near the quality I would expect from such a hyped brew method. I made several modifications to my method for instance  I grind courser and I minimize any kind of ground agitation. I only use the plastic spoon that is included with the siphon brewer to gently fold the grind in so that it is saturated with water; the rest, I let the bubbling of the water do the job. 

 

This morning, I made another pot of Yama siphon coffee from my very freshly roasted (2 day after roast!) Tarzanian Peaberry and I was expecting a phenomenal cup because these beans are very good. However, I was a little sad that the coffee did not turn out as good. The cup has good aroma but the taste was a little bitter so I'm thinking that the coffee was over extracted a little bit. I did leave the Yama to brew the coffee for 75 seconds so perhaps I should decrease this time amount to 60 second next time.

 

The thing that is bothering me is the Baratza Vario which I'm using to grind the coffee is at it coursest setting right now. However, the coffee does not look anywhere near as course as I want. The thing about the Baratza Vario is that you can calibrate it pretty easily so that it can grind courser however, that would mean that you won't be able to grind fine for espresso. For a grinder that is advertise to be versatile as to be able to switch between different brewing method, this is rather unacceptable. I will probably need to contact Baratza to see if they have any solution for this. What I'm thinking is if I was to be able to grind a little courser, I would still be able to use a longer time for the siphon brewer and still do not get over-extraction. In the meanwhile, I might have to break out he Capresso Infinity to do the grinding for siphon.   

Category: BLOG

@jbviau

March 4, 2012 | by sontondaman

yeah, I hope I can find a solution without doing calibration every time I switch grind setting. Hopefully I won't need to buy a separate grinder from drip.

interesting

February 10, 2012 | by wakeknot

I tend to just use my Vario for espresso, but I may have to test it to see how it does on the coarse side of things while still calibrated for espresso.

I'll probably hold on to my

February 7, 2012 | by hoonchul@hotmail.com

I'll probably hold on to my current grinder after I order the vario if this is the case. My wife won't be happy about it but coffee comes first.:)

re-calibrate

February 6, 2012 | by EricBNC


since the grinder does not use a traditional threaded collar to increase the burr gap calibration is the realistic option.

Hmm...

February 5, 2012 | by jbviau

Comments like this make me feel as if I made the right choice in going with the Preciso over the Vario. My ideal press grind setting on the Preciso so far is 34F (out of 40). Hope you find a solution!

@steave

February 5, 2012 | by sontondaman

I probably will not lengthen the brewing as it is already being over-extracted, my siphon is a stove top so heat loss is not a problem.

I would think about the

February 5, 2012 | by intrepid510

I would think about the method you are using for the syphon, this is what James Hoffman said about the syphon on his blog about a week ago, " the syphon. I find it odd that the temperature profile of this brewer isn’t discussed more. It is rare to brew coffee in an environment where the temperature is held stable across a period of 1 to 4 minutes, as we usually do not add any energy beyond the brewing water to the brew. Many people dislike the taste, or are simply disappointed by, the taste of coffee from a syphon. Some might argue that this is because the person brewing lacks the particular ridiculous ninja stirring skills, but more likely the temperature profile of the brew is what is making it stand apart."

Vario Should Be Good Enough

February 5, 2012 | by stephen.rhinehart

I'm not sure I'd advise trying to lengthen the brew time of a vac pot. You lose quite a lot of heat the longer the slurry is up North, so aiming for about a 2:00 steep time is about where you want to be. The tiny heat sources that go along with most vac pots can't do much about heat loss over longer periods of time. As for the Vario, it may be a full-range grinder, but you're right, there needs to be some calibration in between. This is because it's a home, not commercial, grinder. Typical use cases at home are not varied in application, so ideally you're setting to one calibration and keeping it there. Still, my Vario, calibrated for espresso, can produce a grind satisfactory for french press as well. You'll get more fines as your go coarser, but that's a factor of having smaller flat burrs - one of those setbacks shared by every grinder in the class.

Good question

February 5, 2012 | by avaserfi

My Vario arrives tomorrow. I hope you update us on the solution to your problem. Right now I don't have a syphon, but who knows what will happen next!

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