Coffee mustard-glazed hamCoffee and mustard may not sound like go-togethers, but tonight's Easter ham. glazed with an apricot, coffee and mustard glaze was a big hit. In fact, I caught both boys licking the spoon after they stirred the glaze. This one was an improv -- I just added ingredients to taste, but it was so good that I know I'll be playing with it again to fine-tune the measurements so I can write a real recipe for it. In the meantime, here's the general recipe if anyone wants to give it a try.

In a small bowl, mix together:

  • 3/4 cup of dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup spicy brown mustard
  • 1/4 cup apricot preserves, heated till liquid
  • 1 tsp ground cloves
  • 1 cup espresso

I picked Dean's Beans Ring of Fire for this because I knew the smoky, earthy, spicy notes of Indonesian and Pacific Rim coffees would stand up really nicely to the molasses and mustard -- and they did. You could try a Sumatran or East African coffee as well. 

Score the fat on a pre-cooked ham shank  and baste it with the glaze. Transfer the ham to a cooking rack in a large stock pot or lobster pot. Pour a bottle of ale into the bottom of the pan, but make sure that it stays below the bottom of the ham. As you can see from the photo, I used Samuel Adams Summer Ale -- crisp, light and citrus-y. Cover the pot and cook over low heat for about 20 minutes per pound, or until it reaches an internal temperature of 140 F.  Baste with additional glaze every 15-20 minutes. Refrigerate the glaze between basting.

Let the ham rest for 15-20 minutes before slicing.

With the sugar and molasses, the coffee flavor isn't particularly intense, but it's definitely present. I don't cook ham often, but I'll definitely be experimenting with this one again and playing with the proportion of coffee and molasses to see if I can bring out more of the coffee flavor. 

 

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Comments

Submitted by jbviau on
We had curry chicken <lol>. No coffee in there, though I'll bet the combo. could be made to work. Glad your ham turned out so tasty!

Excellent recipe, you are far more creative or knowledgable about cooking and doing so with coffee than I am, as I normally play it safe with just sweets.

Submitted by Chamie on
Thanks :). It's nice to have somewhere to share the experiments. My family appreciates the food, but for the most part, they're tired of hearing about the process and the thinking that goes into it.

Submitted by Chamie on
Hmmm... coffeed curry.. curried coffee? I'll bet it has possibilities. I haven't explored Indian spices too much, but curries have been on my list. I may have to give it a try.

Submitted by Chamie on
Thanks for the compliment. Coffee and sweets are a natural combo -- and I love cooking coffee-flavored desserts, but I also adore the challenge of cooking savory dishes with coffee. I'm fine-tuning ideas for a coffee cookbook -- I've actually got a name, I think. Culinary Coffee -- how does that sound?

I wish I have your recipe before easter! But it ok, I will try it soon! Thank you for yet again another yummy tasting recipe involving coffee.

Submitted by caffeine65 on
This looks SO good. I have a ham in the freezer and will have to try this when I bake it. Coffee is such a must while cooking (both as an ingredient and for the chef). I have had that coffee too and I love it!

Submitted by Chamie on
If you do try it, drop me a line and let me know how it turns out. I'm working on a coffee cookbook, and would love feedback on how things turn out.

Submitted by Chamie on
Close! It fed six for two nights -- one night as the main dish and two nights later as an ingredient in split pea soup. And the bottle of Sam Adams? I had a swig or two of it, and dumped the rest of it into the bottom of the pan when I cooked the ham.

Easter Dinner: Coffee-Mustard Glazed Ham

| by

Coffee mustard-glazed hamCoffee and mustard may not sound like go-togethers, but tonight's Easter ham. glazed with an apricot, coffee and mustard glaze was a big hit. In fact, I caught both boys licking the spoon after they stirred the glaze. This one was an improv -- I just added ingredients to taste, but it was so good that I know I'll be playing with it again to fine-tune the measurements so I can write a real recipe for it. In the meantime, here's the general recipe if anyone wants to give it a try.

In a small bowl, mix together:

  • 3/4 cup of dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup spicy brown mustard
  • 1/4 cup apricot preserves, heated till liquid
  • 1 tsp ground cloves
  • 1 cup espresso

I picked Dean's Beans Ring of Fire for this because I knew the smoky, earthy, spicy notes of Indonesian and Pacific Rim coffees would stand up really nicely to the molasses and mustard -- and they did. You could try a Sumatran or East African coffee as well. 

Score the fat on a pre-cooked ham shank  and baste it with the glaze. Transfer the ham to a cooking rack in a large stock pot or lobster pot. Pour a bottle of ale into the bottom of the pan, but make sure that it stays below the bottom of the ham. As you can see from the photo, I used Samuel Adams Summer Ale -- crisp, light and citrus-y. Cover the pot and cook over low heat for about 20 minutes per pound, or until it reaches an internal temperature of 140 F.  Baste with additional glaze every 15-20 minutes. Refrigerate the glaze between basting.

Let the ham rest for 15-20 minutes before slicing.

With the sugar and molasses, the coffee flavor isn't particularly intense, but it's definitely present. I don't cook ham often, but I'll definitely be experimenting with this one again and playing with the proportion of coffee and molasses to see if I can bring out more of the coffee flavor. 

 

Category: BLOG

@hoonchul

April 11, 2012 | by Chamie

Close! It fed six for two nights -- one night as the main dish and two nights later as an ingredient in split pea soup. And the bottle of Sam Adams? I had a swig or two of it, and dumped the rest of it into the bottom of the pan when I cooked the ham.

That ham looks big enough to

April 11, 2012 | by hoonchul@hotmail.com

That ham looks big enough to feed a family of 20! I like the bottle of samuel adams behind the ham.

@lisa

April 11, 2012 | by Chamie

If you do try it, drop me a line and let me know how it turns out. I'm working on a coffee cookbook, and would love feedback on how things turn out.

EASTER DINNER: COFFEE-MUSTARD GLAZED HAM

April 10, 2012 | by caffeine65

This looks SO good. I have a ham in the freezer and will have to try this when I bake it. Coffee is such a must while cooking (both as an ingredient and for the chef). I have had that coffee too and I love it!

very cool recipe!

April 9, 2012 | by sontondaman

I wish I have your recipe before easter! But it ok, I will try it soon! Thank you for yet again another yummy tasting recipe involving coffee.

@intrepid510

April 9, 2012 | by Chamie

Thanks for the compliment. Coffee and sweets are a natural combo -- and I love cooking coffee-flavored desserts, but I also adore the challenge of cooking savory dishes with coffee. I'm fine-tuning ideas for a coffee cookbook -- I've actually got a name, I think. Culinary Coffee -- how does that sound?

@jbviau

April 9, 2012 | by Chamie

Hmmm... coffeed curry.. curried coffee? I'll bet it has possibilities. I haven't explored Indian spices too much, but curries have been on my list. I may have to give it a try.

@gmanjenks

April 9, 2012 | by Chamie

Thanks :). It's nice to have somewhere to share the experiments. My family appreciates the food, but for the most part, they're tired of hearing about the process and the thinking that goes into it.

Excellent recipe, you are

April 9, 2012 | by intrepid510

Excellent recipe, you are far more creative or knowledgable about cooking and doing so with coffee than I am, as I normally play it safe with just sweets.

Yum

April 9, 2012 | by jbviau

We had curry chicken . No coffee in there, though I'll bet the combo. could be made to work. Glad your ham turned out so tasty!

Now that is a ham that I

April 9, 2012 | by GmanJenks

Now that is a ham that I think I would enjoy. Thank you for sharing your recipe experiments with us.

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