Continuing the exploration of different brewing methods brings me to the pour over drip method. There are several options in the category of pour over but I’ve found the best results using the Hario V60. Hario products come from Japan and are of very high quality. Hario in Japanese means “The king of glass” and they sure are!  All the items I’ve handled are made of very durable glass and ceramic.

So how does a Hario V60 with a big hole in the bottom make a good cup of coffee? Well with the Hario V60 it’s all about the pour. Controlled pouring allows for full extraction of the coffee beans. You’re essentially coaxing the goodness out of the beans from the very first pour. I’ll explain in more detail when I give some brewing tips.



Along with the big hole, the Hario V60 also has a pattern of curved ridges that assist in the flow of water during the extraction process. The filter used with the Hario is also a bit different in that it is a full cone shape with a point to direct the flow of coffee leaving the filter.  



This is a method of brewing I use every morning with my first cup of coffee. I find the hands on approach exciting and a good way to wake me up. It delivers an amazing cup of java that is sure to please.   
 

 

Some method tips on using the Hario V60:

 

  1. Start to boil your water. (Filtered water recommended)  I boil more then I need to have plenty for rinsing and extraction.
  2. As always … Start with fresh roasted beans!    I measure out 26 grams of coffee (about 2 of the Hario scoops) and place it in the grinder until my water is ready.
  3. As the water approaches boil I place my filter in the Hario V60 and rinse it with the hot water. This gets rid of any paper taste which can really ruin any single cup brewing method quickly!
  4. Grind the beans. I grind a little finer then normal drip. Place in your wet filter.
  5. You want to end up with about 14oz. of coffee with this amount of coffee so measure it out from your hot water and place it in something you can pour from.
  6. Bloom your coffee! Yes bloom! This means wetting your beans with the smallest amount of water to get the extraction process started. You should see bubbling as gas escaping if you have fresh coffee. Let this sit for 30-45 seconds.
  7. Water just off the boil around 201 – 205ºF should be used in the following method:
    • Pour slowly in the center in a circular motion
    • Do not hit the edge of the coffee  as this will disturb the extraction of the coffee allowing water to run down the inside of the Hario V60 into your container of extracted coffee
    • Do not fill above the line of the coffee with water
    • Stream your water in a slow controlled circular stream - The Hario V60 Buono Drip Kettle will make this a breeze!
  8. Enjoy the efforts of your work with a great cup of coffee.  Total time should only be about 2-3 minutes.

 

Here are a few pictures from a recent brewing.  Cheers!  Tom

 

Blog Category: 
Blog Image: 

Comments

Submitted by Piper Jones (not verified) on
I agree with the Hario V60 love fest. As a matter of fact, I feel that same way about all Hario products I've had the chance to use. Pour over, in general, is one of my favorite ways to extract good coffees. If done right (coffee/water ratio, water temp, grind level all right - and you can craft this until you get it perfect), you get as close to a perfect cup as I've had with some of the better coffees I've tasted. My suggestions are: 1) to pre-measure your water - as it makes it so easy to know when it's right. I usually add enough extra to rinse the filter as the water is cooling to extraction temperature. Simple equation is 1 rounded tbsp to 5oz cup of water. 2) play with your grind. I went through several 'tests' of sub par coffee just because my grind level wasn't correct. If it's too course it will extract too quickly, too fine and it will take forever - both producing poor examples of what you're capable of with your coffee. This could be drilled into regarding specifics but I think it's easier to just say "play with it until you get it perfect". I love now knowing what Hario means - thanks for talking about something I'm passionate about as well. Piper Jones Kohana Coffee www.kohanacoffee.com

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>The Hario looks more complicated than a regular pour over but is the result is better it might be worth learning to time the pour. Thanks for the information.

Submitted by donnedonne on
I like this, here are some things that might be useful * I think it's better to measure water after you pour, since I prefer the higher, more stable temp. One can use a scale to measure total weight or (my preference) proceed according to flow-rate (a timer helps) * The Hario filters are great but difficult to find...one can make a cone filter out of a #4 or #2 filter, for the 02 or 01 model respectively * One has better control but poorer style if one uses two hands with the kettle (one protected with a towel of course)

Thank you for sharing your thought about this brewing method. I have seen so much talk about this Hario fever thing but never have a chance to try it for myself.

Have a Hario V60 Pour Over!

| by

Continuing the exploration of different brewing methods brings me to the pour over drip method. There are several options in the category of pour over but I’ve found the best results using the Hario V60. Hario products come from Japan and are of very high quality. Hario in Japanese means “The king of glass” and they sure are!  All the items I’ve handled are made of very durable glass and ceramic.

So how does a Hario V60 with a big hole in the bottom make a good cup of coffee? Well with the Hario V60 it’s all about the pour. Controlled pouring allows for full extraction of the coffee beans. You’re essentially coaxing the goodness out of the beans from the very first pour. I’ll explain in more detail when I give some brewing tips.



Along with the big hole, the Hario V60 also has a pattern of curved ridges that assist in the flow of water during the extraction process. The filter used with the Hario is also a bit different in that it is a full cone shape with a point to direct the flow of coffee leaving the filter.  



This is a method of brewing I use every morning with my first cup of coffee. I find the hands on approach exciting and a good way to wake me up. It delivers an amazing cup of java that is sure to please.   
 

 

Some method tips on using the Hario V60:

 

  1. Start to boil your water. (Filtered water recommended)  I boil more then I need to have plenty for rinsing and extraction.
  2. As always … Start with fresh roasted beans!    I measure out 26 grams of coffee (about 2 of the Hario scoops) and place it in the grinder until my water is ready.
  3. As the water approaches boil I place my filter in the Hario V60 and rinse it with the hot water. This gets rid of any paper taste which can really ruin any single cup brewing method quickly!
  4. Grind the beans. I grind a little finer then normal drip. Place in your wet filter.
  5. You want to end up with about 14oz. of coffee with this amount of coffee so measure it out from your hot water and place it in something you can pour from.
  6. Bloom your coffee! Yes bloom! This means wetting your beans with the smallest amount of water to get the extraction process started. You should see bubbling as gas escaping if you have fresh coffee. Let this sit for 30-45 seconds.
  7. Water just off the boil around 201 – 205ºF should be used in the following method:
    • Pour slowly in the center in a circular motion
    • Do not hit the edge of the coffee  as this will disturb the extraction of the coffee allowing water to run down the inside of the Hario V60 into your container of extracted coffee
    • Do not fill above the line of the coffee with water
    • Stream your water in a slow controlled circular stream - The Hario V60 Buono Drip Kettle will make this a breeze!
  8. Enjoy the efforts of your work with a great cup of coffee.  Total time should only be about 2-3 minutes.

 

Here are a few pictures from a recent brewing.  Cheers!  Tom

 

Category: BLOG

nice!

February 12, 2012 | by sontondaman

Thank you for sharing your thought about this brewing method. I have seen so much talk about this Hario fever thing but never have a chance to try it for myself.

I really like the products

December 5, 2011 | by intrepid510

I really like the products I've used from them, and would like to try their pull overs.

rave reviews

November 8, 2011 | by wakeknot

I just had a friend raving about this to me. I can't wait to try one.

Hario V60

April 2, 2011 | by donnedonne

I like this, here are some things that might be useful * I think it's better to measure water after you pour, since I prefer the higher, more stable temp. One can use a scale to measure total weight or (my preference) proceed according to flow-rate (a timer helps) * The Hario filters are great but difficult to find...one can make a cone filter out of a #4 or #2 filter, for the 02 or 01 model respectively * One has better control but poorer style if one uses two hands with the kettle (one protected with a towel of course)

Nice review Tom!

August 20, 2010 | by EricBNC


The Hario looks more complicated than a regular pour over but is the result is better it might be worth learning to time the pour. Thanks for the information.

Hario V60

August 19, 2010 | by Piper Jones

I agree with the Hario V60 love fest. As a matter of fact, I feel that same way about all Hario products I've had the chance to use. Pour over, in general, is one of my favorite ways to extract good coffees. If done right (coffee/water ratio, water temp, grind level all right - and you can craft this until you get it perfect), you get as close to a perfect cup as I've had with some of the better coffees I've tasted. My suggestions are: 1) to pre-measure your water - as it makes it so easy to know when it's right. I usually add enough extra to rinse the filter as the water is cooling to extraction temperature. Simple equation is 1 rounded tbsp to 5oz cup of water. 2) play with your grind. I went through several 'tests' of sub par coffee just because my grind level wasn't correct. If it's too course it will extract too quickly, too fine and it will take forever - both producing poor examples of what you're capable of with your coffee. This could be drilled into regarding specifics but I think it's easier to just say "play with it until you get it perfect". I love now knowing what Hario means - thanks for talking about something I'm passionate about as well. Piper Jones Kohana Coffee www.kohanacoffee.com

Categories

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_blog_on.png

    BLOG

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_knowledge1_on.png

    KNOWLEDGE

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_news_on.png

    NEWS

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_guides_on_1.png

    BREWING GUIDES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_buying_guides_on_1.png

    BUYING GUIDES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/drink_guide_1.png

    DRINK GUIDES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/recipehover.png

    RECIPES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/latest%20reviews.png

    LATEST REVIEWS