As you who follow these blogs know by now, I have been experimenting with home coffee roasting using an eight dollar heat gun from Harbor Freight along with a metal bowl and a wooden salad fork to stir with (I think I forgot to mention the wooden salad fork last time). This experiment has produced som surprisingly good results for so simple a process.

 
 
Sure enough, I went back to the well again today - I wanted to mow the grass before the predicted rains came this evening but my plan went awry. The mower had a flat front tire. I pulled off the tire and rim so my wife could run it up to the local service station for repair.  My teen age son, who was helping me with yard work, and I took a break while we waited for the tire to return.
 

In the lull I noticed my heat gun and bowl sitting on the rack in my garage. I went inside and measured 228g of Brazil Cerrado. I tried something different by pouring the beans into a mesh deep fryer basket that I inserted into the metal bowl. Not sure if it helped or hurt but the chaff separated quickly using this method. I feared the roast was not progressing as evenly using the extra basket so at three minutes in I dumped the beans in the bowl and roasted the rest of the way inside only the metal bowl.

 
 
 
Good times here based on the numbers and the visual and olfactory clues and cues - It took 7:45 to hit first crack (a powerful one too) with a finish at 12 minutes on the nose. They look and smell respectable to me but I have not cupped them yet. The roast was cooled and packaged in a glass jar about the same time my wife came back with the repaired tire. I managed to get my roasting jones on and still mow the yard - all in all a decent Saturday afternoon!
 


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Comments

Hmm the metal bowl saga continues, I guess the extra mesh did not allow the beans to heat up enough, lost too much heat to properly roast without baking?

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>might have been the case if I did not dump them - once they hit the metal bowl and my deft stirring the colors evened out - at only 3-ish minutes in they were drying and giving up some chaff but were still more green than brown - definitely not baked - the time was longer on purpose - I pulled the roast just at the point I heard the beginning of second crack. ; )

Submitted by GmanJenks on
Thank you for this series of posts. I love the way you show it can be an easy and lost cost endeavor. Inspires me to start hunting for an $8 heat gun so I can try some of my own.

Submitted by jbviau on
Nice. Hey, what's your secret for convincing your wife to do errands for you? Oh, and for getting her excited about roasting coffee? ;)

Submitted by dpablo19 on
You were able to get some pretty impressive results with that gun. The beans seems to be very consistently colored. How is the taste as compared to air roasters?

Heat Gun Metal Bowl Home Roasting - Part Three

| by

As you who follow these blogs know by now, I have been experimenting with home coffee roasting using an eight dollar heat gun from Harbor Freight along with a metal bowl and a wooden salad fork to stir with (I think I forgot to mention the wooden salad fork last time). This experiment has produced som surprisingly good results for so simple a process.

 
 
Sure enough, I went back to the well again today - I wanted to mow the grass before the predicted rains came this evening but my plan went awry. The mower had a flat front tire. I pulled off the tire and rim so my wife could run it up to the local service station for repair.  My teen age son, who was helping me with yard work, and I took a break while we waited for the tire to return.
 

In the lull I noticed my heat gun and bowl sitting on the rack in my garage. I went inside and measured 228g of Brazil Cerrado. I tried something different by pouring the beans into a mesh deep fryer basket that I inserted into the metal bowl. Not sure if it helped or hurt but the chaff separated quickly using this method. I feared the roast was not progressing as evenly using the extra basket so at three minutes in I dumped the beans in the bowl and roasted the rest of the way inside only the metal bowl.

 
 
 
Good times here based on the numbers and the visual and olfactory clues and cues - It took 7:45 to hit first crack (a powerful one too) with a finish at 12 minutes on the nose. They look and smell respectable to me but I have not cupped them yet. The roast was cooled and packaged in a glass jar about the same time my wife came back with the repaired tire. I managed to get my roasting jones on and still mow the yard - all in all a decent Saturday afternoon!
 


Category: BLOG

I'm with jbviau , what is

April 23, 2012 | by hoonchul@hotmail.com

I'm with jbviau , what is the secret? I can't even get my wife to throw away the garbage.

Amazing

April 22, 2012 | by dpablo19

You were able to get some pretty impressive results with that gun. The beans seems to be very consistently colored. How is the taste as compared to air roasters?

Roasting with the family

April 22, 2012 | by jbviau

Nice. Hey, what's your secret for convincing your wife to do errands for you? Oh, and for getting her excited about roasting coffee? ;)

Thank you for this series of

April 22, 2012 | by GmanJenks

Thank you for this series of posts. I love the way you show it can be an easy and lost cost endeavor. Inspires me to start hunting for an $8 heat gun so I can try some of my own.

not baked

April 21, 2012 | by EricBNC


might have been the case if I did not dump them - once they hit the metal bowl and my deft stirring the colors evened out - at only 3-ish minutes in they were drying and giving up some chaff but were still more green than brown - definitely not baked - the time was longer on purpose - I pulled the roast just at the point I heard the beginning of second crack. ; )

Hmm the metal bowl saga

April 21, 2012 | by intrepid510

Hmm the metal bowl saga continues, I guess the extra mesh did not allow the beans to heat up enough, lost too much heat to properly roast without baking?

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