Hey guys, here’s another info-graphic I found:

http://coffeecupnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/coffee.png

 

This one is discussing the impact that coffee has had on America, and unlike the other one this one has sources listed at the bottom.

 

The parts that I thought were pretty interesting and something I hadn’t really thought about is that before coffee came to America, tea was the drink of choice. After it arrived, they were on equal footing until the Boston Tea Party, when tea became unpatriotic and coffee became the most popular drink (after water). A spot that it still enjoys today.

 

The invention of “instant” coffee by Satori Kato, can be seen as both a blessing (for  allowing those who don’t have access to their gear to get a coffee fix) or a curse (based on the taste of most of “instant” coffees).

 

A couple of the other statistics are things that we’ve covered on Roaste before, but are still pretty interesting to me. 

 

First, there’s the statistic that the average American spends 45 hours a year waiting in line for coffee. That seemed pretty crazy to me, but then I actually calculated a bit and realized that if you spend 10 minutes every morning making coffee that’s actually ~61 hours a year. Although, I suppose this is just the time spent waiting in line and not counting walking/driving to the coffee house.

 

Second, the statistic that the average American spends $164.71 per year. That means they spend around 45 cents per day on coffee if they drink coffee every day. I’m assuming that this is mostly from drinking supermarket brands at home, and it’s not really something that Roaste.com can compete with price wise I don’t think. Especially if you figure in the earlier statistic that each person drinks 3 cups of coffee per day. Which breaks down to 15 cents per cup. I think we can all agree though that the extra cost is worth it.

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Comments

Nice little graphic, I imagine the cost of coffee is divided among those that do not have a lot of coffee too that probably brings down the average a little.

Submitted by jbviau on
Wow, I have *no* patience for waiting in line to get coffee. Good thing I don't have to! About coffee and history, we recently went down to Williamsburg, VA, for a short weekend visit with family. I got sick and missed out on touring this, but apparently colonial Williamsburg has a restored 18th-c. coffee shop you can visit and sample coffee at: http://www.history.org/almanack/places/hb/hbcoffee.cfm

I find that I spend way more time doing coffee related things (fixing espresso machine, roasting coffee, preparing drip and espresso) and also spend way more money on coffee.

The History of Coffee in America

| by

Hey guys, here’s another info-graphic I found:

http://coffeecupnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/coffee.png

 

This one is discussing the impact that coffee has had on America, and unlike the other one this one has sources listed at the bottom.

 

The parts that I thought were pretty interesting and something I hadn’t really thought about is that before coffee came to America, tea was the drink of choice. After it arrived, they were on equal footing until the Boston Tea Party, when tea became unpatriotic and coffee became the most popular drink (after water). A spot that it still enjoys today.

 

The invention of “instant” coffee by Satori Kato, can be seen as both a blessing (for  allowing those who don’t have access to their gear to get a coffee fix) or a curse (based on the taste of most of “instant” coffees).

 

A couple of the other statistics are things that we’ve covered on Roaste before, but are still pretty interesting to me. 

 

First, there’s the statistic that the average American spends 45 hours a year waiting in line for coffee. That seemed pretty crazy to me, but then I actually calculated a bit and realized that if you spend 10 minutes every morning making coffee that’s actually ~61 hours a year. Although, I suppose this is just the time spent waiting in line and not counting walking/driving to the coffee house.

 

Second, the statistic that the average American spends $164.71 per year. That means they spend around 45 cents per day on coffee if they drink coffee every day. I’m assuming that this is mostly from drinking supermarket brands at home, and it’s not really something that Roaste.com can compete with price wise I don’t think. Especially if you figure in the earlier statistic that each person drinks 3 cups of coffee per day. Which breaks down to 15 cents per cup. I think we can all agree though that the extra cost is worth it.

Category: BLOG

I'm fairly sure I'm saving

April 8, 2012 | by hoonchul@hotmail.com

I'm fairly sure I'm saving by making coffee at home but nothing beats being able to make espresso or cappuccino at home whenever you feel like.

@Son Ton

April 7, 2012 | by Karrde

Probably true, a lot of times the money we save via making coffee at home is spent pursing perfecting our setups. :)

cool!

April 7, 2012 | by sontondaman

I find that I spend way more time doing coffee related things (fixing espresso machine, roasting coffee, preparing drip and espresso) and also spend way more money on coffee.

@jbviau

April 6, 2012 | by Karrde

Ah, stinks you missed out on that. I bet even if the coffee wasn't great it would at least be an experience right?

@intrepid510

April 6, 2012 | by Karrde

That makes sense I think. That average is actually more than I have in a day. I have probably around 2 cups per day on average.

Fun

April 6, 2012 | by jbviau

Wow, I have *no* patience for waiting in line to get coffee. Good thing I don't have to! About coffee and history, we recently went down to Williamsburg, VA, for a short weekend visit with family. I got sick and missed out on touring this, but apparently colonial Williamsburg has a restored 18th-c. coffee shop you can visit and sample coffee at: http://www.history.org/almanack/places/hb/hbcoffee.cfm

Nice little graphic, I

April 6, 2012 | by intrepid510

Nice little graphic, I imagine the cost of coffee is divided among those that do not have a lot of coffee too that probably brings down the average a little.

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