So after a series of disapointment with the espresso that I pulled with lightly roasted washed coffees (although they did make delicious aeropress and french press coffee!), I switching to something a bit more exciting. I have been saving some amount of Kopi Luwak beans from Viet Nam for special occasion and I think now is a good time to bring it out and roast it. 

So I roast it in the Hottop and let it rest for several days, and now it is the time for it to be brewed up in the Ponte Vecchio lever espresso machine. I put about 14 grams (for most beans this is the amount I usually start with in the PV) and grind it using the Mazzer Super Jolly (this coffee tend to be very hard and might contain some small stones in some rare occasion so I do not want to kill my beloved Baratza Vario grinding these beans; the mazzer is a beast so the occasion stone does no harm to it). Fourteen grams of this coffee produces less volume of ground than "normal" coffee but I stuck with it anyway, first shot was way too quick and water gushed through it! Now I remembered that this coffee needed to be grind very fine. I didn't dare to throw away the shot but I put it in some microfoamed milk with some sugar, it was very delicious nevertheless!!!

about thirty minutes later, I go for another shot at this coffee, yet another 14 grams into the Mazzer, this time grinded much finner; the resulting shot looks absolutely delicious, thick mousy persistent creama and can hold tons of sugar (of course  I did not put ton of sugar into this espresso, but just a little bit). The aroma from this coffee is super unique, almost all nutty aroma, I could swear I was grinding roasted peanut when I smell the ground coffee!

Before everyone acuse me about drinking espresso with sugar, let me explain! Kopi Luwak espresso begg for sugar to be added because it lack sweetness. The espresso when tasted, will lack any bitterness taste and also will lack sweetness and acidity that you would normally find with high quality coffee beans. My hypothesis is that the sugar in the coffee bean are very soluble and dissolve away in the digestive track of the civet. But when you add sugar to the kopi luwak espresso, it really opens up the flavor; it is very smooth and nutty, almost like chewing on a peanut candy bar!

Blog Category: 

Comments

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>Steaming fresh brown Kopi - never had it but now I understand it better - thanks!

I have a question; how does it stack up against a really good sweet roasted coffee? I get the appeal is its milk nature, but there surely are some really good blends out there that accomplish this.

Kopi Luwak?

| by

So after a series of disapointment with the espresso that I pulled with lightly roasted washed coffees (although they did make delicious aeropress and french press coffee!), I switching to something a bit more exciting. I have been saving some amount of Kopi Luwak beans from Viet Nam for special occasion and I think now is a good time to bring it out and roast it. 

So I roast it in the Hottop and let it rest for several days, and now it is the time for it to be brewed up in the Ponte Vecchio lever espresso machine. I put about 14 grams (for most beans this is the amount I usually start with in the PV) and grind it using the Mazzer Super Jolly (this coffee tend to be very hard and might contain some small stones in some rare occasion so I do not want to kill my beloved Baratza Vario grinding these beans; the mazzer is a beast so the occasion stone does no harm to it). Fourteen grams of this coffee produces less volume of ground than "normal" coffee but I stuck with it anyway, first shot was way too quick and water gushed through it! Now I remembered that this coffee needed to be grind very fine. I didn't dare to throw away the shot but I put it in some microfoamed milk with some sugar, it was very delicious nevertheless!!!

about thirty minutes later, I go for another shot at this coffee, yet another 14 grams into the Mazzer, this time grinded much finner; the resulting shot looks absolutely delicious, thick mousy persistent creama and can hold tons of sugar (of course  I did not put ton of sugar into this espresso, but just a little bit). The aroma from this coffee is super unique, almost all nutty aroma, I could swear I was grinding roasted peanut when I smell the ground coffee!

Before everyone acuse me about drinking espresso with sugar, let me explain! Kopi Luwak espresso begg for sugar to be added because it lack sweetness. The espresso when tasted, will lack any bitterness taste and also will lack sweetness and acidity that you would normally find with high quality coffee beans. My hypothesis is that the sugar in the coffee bean are very soluble and dissolve away in the digestive track of the civet. But when you add sugar to the kopi luwak espresso, it really opens up the flavor; it is very smooth and nutty, almost like chewing on a peanut candy bar!

Category: BLOG

"almost like chewing on a peanut candy bar"

November 7, 2011 | by jbviau

That's funny because the weasel coffee poo looks a lot like what you describe!

I have a question; how does

November 5, 2011 | by intrepid510

I have a question; how does it stack up against a really good sweet roasted coffee? I get the appeal is its milk nature, but there surely are some really good blends out there that accomplish this.

Steaming fresh

November 5, 2011 | by EricBNC


Steaming fresh brown Kopi - never had it but now I understand it better - thanks!

Vietnam

November 5, 2011 | by yeahyeah

I've never tried a S.O. from Vietnam.

interesting theory

November 4, 2011 | by wakeknot

I wonder if you could be right about the sugar? I've never tried it, but it seems plausible.

some say roasted peanut is a

November 4, 2011 | by donnedonne

some say roasted peanut is a defect but if it tastes good, that's what counts

Categories

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_blog_on.png

    BLOG

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_knowledge1_on.png

    KNOWLEDGE

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_news_on.png

    NEWS

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_guides_on_1.png

    BREWING GUIDES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_buying_guides_on_1.png

    BUYING GUIDES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/drink_guide_1.png

    DRINK GUIDES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/recipehover.png

    RECIPES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/latest%20reviews.png

    LATEST REVIEWS