When I blogged a month ago about pre-ordering the LIDO, I mentioned having high expectations. Now that this hand grinder extraordinaire has arrived (full disclosure: I’ve actually been playing with it since 3/9), I can safely say that those expectations have been met.

Originally, I intended to do an unboxing post here, but others have published better pics already, and I’ve been “blogging” for free about the LIDO over on HB in the interim (silly me!)--mainly because there’s a dedicated group of fellow owners on that site to interact with. Instead, I’ll provide an exclusive shot of the LIDO next to one of its suddenly-obsolete ancestors, the Hario Mini, for your viewing pleasure.

So, what can I say here that I haven’t already said elsewhere? I’m tempted to boldly claim that despite its $165 price tag the LIDO is a bargain because it essentially performs at the same level as (or possibly better than) a Baratza Preciso in the non-espresso range. However, I haven’t yet tested the grinder out for espresso. It’s stepless and should do fairly well, but one never knows. To be continued, I guess.

Alternatively, I could emphasize the fact that it’s a well-crafted, high-quality tool likely to outlast most coffee-related gear (as well as many people).

Finally, it might be informative to share a few embarrassing details, namely (a) that I sometimes grind beans late at night with the LIDO that I have no intention of brewing, simply because I enjoy using it that much, and (b) that I occasionally take the mill out of its neoprene travel bag and crank the handle a few times with nothing in the hopper for similar reasons (echoes of “My Precious” for you LOTR fans).

Anyway, what would you all be interested in knowing about the LIDO? I’m more than happy to run whatever grinding experiments you devise.

--------------------

Currently working through: Klatch’s Brazil Fazenda Rainha
On the way: Kuma Coffee’s Burundi Gacokwe

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Comments

Congrats on the Lido!!I really wish I can play with one. The things I would like to know is how well it grinds for espresso, because most people seem to get the Lido for brewed coffee, not espresso. ie how many turns per 16g beans, the taste, the fine adjustment ergonomic for espresso(how hard it is to make repeatable minute adjustment)..that is if you have time to play with it..;P

awsome little write up, never used a hand grinder before so i have no idea how hard it is to grind the amount of beans for a brew. how long does it take and do you use it mainly as a fine drip?

Submitted by GmanJenks on
I know I want one, I just want to know if I still need another grinder for brew or press as well. Would you grind by hand for a full pot (say a Bonavita with thermal carafe)? or if this type of volume really is best suited to an electric?

Submitted by jbviau on
Since some of you seemed interested, I ground 20 g. worth of beans at 3 different settings tonight just to see how long it took. Aimed for about 2 turns/sec., though I'm not a machine. ;) Here's what I found: Press grind (2 turns CCW from zero) - took 38 sec. (very easy) Drip grind (1 turn CCW from zero) - took 43 sec. (little more resistance) Espresso grind (3/8 turn CCW from zero) - took 58 sec. (harder; a few stalls)

Submitted by jbviau on
I'll probably have to do a future post on espresso. Don't know all the answers yet, but I can say that the fine adjustment is there and very repeatable. My only worry re: repeatability is that the zero point might eventually shift somewhat once the burrs are fully broken in, but that's not a huge deal (same is true for all grinders AFAIK).

Submitted by jbviau on
Honestly, grinding by hand for espresso would take some getting used to for me due to the extra muscle involved relative to a coarser grind. However, the LIDO's grind consistency will spoil you; starting with it would make stepping down to a less effective/sturdy hand mill difficult, I'd imagine. If you were looking to grind *only* for espresso, I'd seriously consider an OE Pharos instead, though the Pharos doesn't have a catch jar for the ground coffee, which you have to shake/spank out of it.

Submitted by jbviau on
Thanks. Nope, I've been using the LIDO for coarse grinding pretty much exclusively so far, which is in line with my brewing preferences. When moving from the Eva Solo to the Clever or Aeropress I just steep longer to compensate. OE's grind analysis suggests there's a sweet spot with the LIDO at about 2 turns CCW from zero with respect to minimizing fines production, so I'm experimenting with staying at or near that spot.

Submitted by jbviau on
Cool! Based on what I found tonight, I'd estimate you could crank out a full 60 g. for a Bonavita pot in 2 min. and change. That's not bad, but I don't know if you'd want to go to the trouble with company over, etc. (depends on personal preference, I guess). In a pinch you could always pre-grind and then seal in a Mason jar, which I've had success with provided I start with fresh coffee. My impression (still not fully formed) is that I could happily live with the LIDO alone to fulfill my grinding needs, but I'm not ready to give up my Preciso just yet.

Submitted by jbviau on
It's beastly, for sure. Pepper though? Are you serious? ;) If someone came near the LIDO with anything other than unflavored coffee I'd probably tackle them.

That Lido grinder looks very interesting. I have a Hario Mini Mill and would love it if you could compare the Lido against the Hario Mini Mill. Thanks!

Submitted by jbviau on
I actually got rid of my Hario Mini already. It was a back-up that I never really had a chance to use more than once or twice. The LIDO is stepless vs. the Mini's stepped adjustment, so that's one difference. The main thing though is that the LIDO's burr stability is in a league of its own, about as rock-solid as one could possibly imagine, allowing it to shine in comparison at coarser settings. Any other questions? Feel free to send me a message.

Submitted by donnedonne on
i went with the LIDO b/c I had horrible experiences with even the expensive Porlex and didn't want to roll the dice with something like a Peugeot

Submitted by jbviau on
Ah, I've never used either of the hand mills you mentioned. No need for them anymore now! I'm pretty sure you'll be pleased with the LIDO.

LIDO in the house! A few thoughts after two weeks of grinding by hand

| by

When I blogged a month ago about pre-ordering the LIDO, I mentioned having high expectations. Now that this hand grinder extraordinaire has arrived (full disclosure: I’ve actually been playing with it since 3/9), I can safely say that those expectations have been met.

Originally, I intended to do an unboxing post here, but others have published better pics already, and I’ve been “blogging” for free about the LIDO over on HB in the interim (silly me!)--mainly because there’s a dedicated group of fellow owners on that site to interact with. Instead, I’ll provide an exclusive shot of the LIDO next to one of its suddenly-obsolete ancestors, the Hario Mini, for your viewing pleasure.

So, what can I say here that I haven’t already said elsewhere? I’m tempted to boldly claim that despite its $165 price tag the LIDO is a bargain because it essentially performs at the same level as (or possibly better than) a Baratza Preciso in the non-espresso range. However, I haven’t yet tested the grinder out for espresso. It’s stepless and should do fairly well, but one never knows. To be continued, I guess.

Alternatively, I could emphasize the fact that it’s a well-crafted, high-quality tool likely to outlast most coffee-related gear (as well as many people).

Finally, it might be informative to share a few embarrassing details, namely (a) that I sometimes grind beans late at night with the LIDO that I have no intention of brewing, simply because I enjoy using it that much, and (b) that I occasionally take the mill out of its neoprene travel bag and crank the handle a few times with nothing in the hopper for similar reasons (echoes of “My Precious” for you LOTR fans).

Anyway, what would you all be interested in knowing about the LIDO? I’m more than happy to run whatever grinding experiments you devise.

--------------------

Currently working through: Klatch’s Brazil Fazenda Rainha
On the way: Kuma Coffee’s Burundi Gacokwe

Category: BLOG

@broseph

April 10, 2012 | by jbviau

Ah, I've never used either of the hand mills you mentioned. No need for them anymore now! I'm pretty sure you'll be pleased with the LIDO.

i went with the LIDO b/c I

April 10, 2012 | by donnedonne

i went with the LIDO b/c I had horrible experiences with even the expensive Porlex and didn't want to roll the dice with something like a Peugeot

@Son Ton

April 1, 2012 | by jbviau

I actually got rid of my Hario Mini already. It was a back-up that I never really had a chance to use more than once or twice. The LIDO is stepless vs. the Mini's stepped adjustment, so that's one difference. The main thing though is that the LIDO's burr stability is in a league of its own, about as rock-solid as one could possibly imagine, allowing it to shine in comparison at coarser settings. Any other questions? Feel free to send me a message.

nice grinder!

April 1, 2012 | by sontondaman

That Lido grinder looks very interesting. I have a Hario Mini Mill and would love it if you could compare the Lido against the Hario Mini Mill. Thanks!

@hoonchul

March 27, 2012 | by jbviau

It's beastly, for sure. Pepper though? Are you serious? ;) If someone came near the LIDO with anything other than unflavored coffee I'd probably tackle them.

That is one beast of hand

March 27, 2012 | by hoonchul@hotmail.com

That is one beast of hand grinder. If you need excuse to crank the handle, maybe you can use it as pepper grinder?

@GmanJenks

March 27, 2012 | by jbviau

Cool! Based on what I found tonight, I'd estimate you could crank out a full 60 g. for a Bonavita pot in 2 min. and change. That's not bad, but I don't know if you'd want to go to the trouble with company over, etc. (depends on personal preference, I guess). In a pinch you could always pre-grind and then seal in a Mason jar, which I've had success with provided I start with fresh coffee. My impression (still not fully formed) is that I could happily live with the LIDO alone to fulfill my grinding needs, but I'm not ready to give up my Preciso just yet.

@intrepid510

March 27, 2012 | by jbviau

Thanks. Nope, I've been using the LIDO for coarse grinding pretty much exclusively so far, which is in line with my brewing preferences. When moving from the Eva Solo to the Clever or Aeropress I just steep longer to compensate. OE's grind analysis suggests there's a sweet spot with the LIDO at about 2 turns CCW from zero with respect to minimizing fines production, so I'm experimenting with staying at or near that spot.

@Karrde

March 27, 2012 | by jbviau

Honestly, grinding by hand for espresso would take some getting used to for me due to the extra muscle involved relative to a coarser grind. However, the LIDO's grind consistency will spoil you; starting with it would make stepping down to a less effective/sturdy hand mill difficult, I'd imagine. If you were looking to grind *only* for espresso, I'd seriously consider an OE Pharos instead, though the Pharos doesn't have a catch jar for the ground coffee, which you have to shake/spank out of it.

@samuellaw178

March 27, 2012 | by jbviau

I'll probably have to do a future post on espresso. Don't know all the answers yet, but I can say that the fine adjustment is there and very repeatable. My only worry re: repeatability is that the zero point might eventually shift somewhat once the burrs are fully broken in, but that's not a huge deal (same is true for all grinders AFAIK).

How long to crank it out?

March 27, 2012 | by jbviau

Since some of you seemed interested, I ground 20 g. worth of beans at 3 different settings tonight just to see how long it took. Aimed for about 2 turns/sec., though I'm not a machine. ;) Here's what I found: Press grind (2 turns CCW from zero) - took 38 sec. (very easy) Drip grind (1 turn CCW from zero) - took 43 sec. (little more resistance) Espresso grind (3/8 turn CCW from zero) - took 58 sec. (harder; a few stalls)

I know I want one, I just

March 26, 2012 | by GmanJenks

I know I want one, I just want to know if I still need another grinder for brew or press as well. Would you grind by hand for a full pot (say a Bonavita with thermal carafe)? or if this type of volume really is best suited to an electric?

awsome little write up,

March 26, 2012 | by intrepid510

awsome little write up, never used a hand grinder before so i have no idea how hard it is to grind the amount of beans for a brew. how long does it take and do you use it mainly as a fine drip?

My main questions would be

March 26, 2012 | by Karrde

My main questions would be regarding espresso and also how long do you find that it takes to grind compared to an electric grinder. I've never used a hand grinder, would you recommend this one as a good starter?

Nice!

March 26, 2012 | by samuellaw178

Congrats on the Lido!!I really wish I can play with one. The things I would like to know is how well it grinds for espresso, because most people seem to get the Lido for brewed coffee, not espresso. ie how many turns per 16g beans, the taste, the fine adjustment ergonomic for espresso(how hard it is to make repeatable minute adjustment)..that is if you have time to play with it..;P

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