Today morning, after rushing out of the door, I have done it again! Yes, just a week earlier, I leaved the Pavoni on acidently for an extended amount of time and today, I did that also. Thankfully, no damage was done, the Pavoni was just getting really hot when it time for me tod come home and realize what I have done. I really need to find a way to make sure this does not happen anymore in the future. Any way, what I want to update today is about the lever technique that I use with the Pavoni.

Most of the time, I use the move call "fellini" move to preinfuse the coffee puck. This, however achieve another thing with the Pavoni and that is to add more liquid to the shot. Thus there are those time when I want "shorter" shot, I would do away with the fellini move. Here is a little video showing more what I'm talking about:

A little summary of my technique is the follow: 

-turn the machine on

-purge false pressure

-grind groom and tamp the puck

-engage the portafilter loosely, raise the lever, before the point were water will come out then tighten the portafilter.

-Pump up and down 2-3 times gently, this is called the fellini move

-pull your shot!

 

 

Blog Category: 

Comments

I'm a big fan of the Fellini move, but I don't see it as a preinfusion technique. Leaving the lever locked up would be roughly equivalent to a line pressure preinfusion that you might get on a more commercial machine. The move from the film is more like a hack to introduce more water into the brew column without breaking the puck with a double pull - which is essentially what I do. I'd call it 1 and 1/4 pulls, but the 1/4 comes first. Lots of room for interpretation though, as it was a tiny part in a film not about coffee at all.

I like your video! It gives me a feel of using the Pavoni. The Pavoni seems to need a second holding hand for operating. This differs quite a bit from my Cremina that is pretty stable on the counter. The shot looks great! I am always cautious to use felini though because some says it fractures the puck if not done carefully. I personally don't find the need for Felini yet, so thats not a biggies for me. ;P

Submitted by jbviau on
That was informative. Lever machines are truly different from what I'm used to, and I'd love to play around with one at some point.

Yeah, I guess i see your point about it not being a preinfusion method as much as a way to introduce more water.

Yeah, I have heard that the Cremina is much more stable than the Pavoni. In the begin, there were quite a few time the pavoni would shuffle back when I pull the shot. So I have learn to either hold the boiler can or the portafilter while pulling shot to stabilize the machine.

yeah, I had the same feeling about lever machine when I first moved from using a pump machine as well. Mostly, I was skeptical but now I'm a believer in lever.

Submitted by avaserfi on
I've pulled shots on a Microcasa, but even that is very different than using a Pavoni. Very interesting. Thanks!

Seems like a lot of work to make a shot certainly more effort than I ever use for making a shot on my classic and I am not talking about using the lever. Does it really require such effort to get a good shot?

Submitted by wakeknot on
I tend to find my shots are not as good with the Fellini, but perhaps I just need to work on it. I indeed would love to get more volume from my shots than I get from a single pull.

a little update on the Pavoni Lever

| by

Today morning, after rushing out of the door, I have done it again! Yes, just a week earlier, I leaved the Pavoni on acidently for an extended amount of time and today, I did that also. Thankfully, no damage was done, the Pavoni was just getting really hot when it time for me tod come home and realize what I have done. I really need to find a way to make sure this does not happen anymore in the future. Any way, what I want to update today is about the lever technique that I use with the Pavoni.

Most of the time, I use the move call "fellini" move to preinfuse the coffee puck. This, however achieve another thing with the Pavoni and that is to add more liquid to the shot. Thus there are those time when I want "shorter" shot, I would do away with the fellini move. Here is a little video showing more what I'm talking about:

A little summary of my technique is the follow: 

-turn the machine on

-purge false pressure

-grind groom and tamp the puck

-engage the portafilter loosely, raise the lever, before the point were water will come out then tighten the portafilter.

-Pump up and down 2-3 times gently, this is called the fellini move

-pull your shot!

 

 

Category: BLOG

good technique

February 10, 2012 | by wakeknot

I tend to find my shots are not as good with the Fellini, but perhaps I just need to work on it. I indeed would love to get more volume from my shots than I get from a single pull.

looks like a great shot - I

February 6, 2012 | by EricBNC


looks like a great shot - I could see that ritual being enjoyable - nice video.

Watching the video just

February 6, 2012 | by hoonchul@hotmail.com

Watching the video just confirmed that lever machine is not for me-just requires too much concentration and effort. Yes I'm very lazy.

Seems like a lot of work to

February 5, 2012 | by intrepid510

Seems like a lot of work to make a shot certainly more effort than I ever use for making a shot on my classic and I am not talking about using the lever. Does it really require such effort to get a good shot?

Wow

February 4, 2012 | by avaserfi

I've pulled shots on a Microcasa, but even that is very different than using a Pavoni. Very interesting. Thanks!

@jbviau

February 4, 2012 | by sontondaman

yeah, I had the same feeling about lever machine when I first moved from using a pump machine as well. Mostly, I was skeptical but now I'm a believer in lever.

@samuellaw178

February 4, 2012 | by sontondaman

Yeah, I have heard that the Cremina is much more stable than the Pavoni. In the begin, there were quite a few time the pavoni would shuffle back when I pull the shot. So I have learn to either hold the boiler can or the portafilter while pulling shot to stabilize the machine.

@steave

February 3, 2012 | by sontondaman

Yeah, I guess i see your point about it not being a preinfusion method as much as a way to introduce more water.

Thanks

February 3, 2012 | by jbviau

That was informative. Lever machines are truly different from what I'm used to, and I'd love to play around with one at some point.

Nice

February 3, 2012 | by samuellaw178

I like your video! It gives me a feel of using the Pavoni. The Pavoni seems to need a second holding hand for operating. This differs quite a bit from my Cremina that is pretty stable on the counter. The shot looks great! I am always cautious to use felini though because some says it fractures the puck if not done carefully. I personally don't find the need for Felini yet, so thats not a biggies for me. ;P

I'm a big fan of the Fellini

February 3, 2012 | by stephen.rhinehart

I'm a big fan of the Fellini move, but I don't see it as a preinfusion technique. Leaving the lever locked up would be roughly equivalent to a line pressure preinfusion that you might get on a more commercial machine. The move from the film is more like a hack to introduce more water into the brew column without breaking the puck with a double pull - which is essentially what I do. I'd call it 1 and 1/4 pulls, but the 1/4 comes first. Lots of room for interpretation though, as it was a tiny part in a film not about coffee at all.

Categories

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_blog_on.png

    BLOG

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_knowledge1_on.png

    KNOWLEDGE

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_news_on.png

    NEWS

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_guides_on_1.png

    BREWING GUIDES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/icon_buying_guides_on_1.png

    BUYING GUIDES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/drink_guide_1.png

    DRINK GUIDES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/recipehover.png

    RECIPES

  • http://coffeekind.com/sites/default/files/latest%20reviews.png

    LATEST REVIEWS