Thanks to my Melitta CBR-10 fluid bed 1000 watt personal coffee roaster, fresh coffee is available to me at a moment's notice in 40 gram increments.  That's right, this thing is designed to hold 50 - 55g green coffee maximum capacity which nets a little over 40g of roasted beans.  I aimed for a 40g batch since this is my usual ground coffee volume when making a 20 fl oz pot using the venerable Krups Cafe Prima 4 cup coffee brewer.  This translates into approximately a 14% moisture loss which is what I get with my other roasting methods.

I chose a mediocre Dominican Republic green coffee bean for my first roast - I was not sure if this Melitta would bake the beans or roast them.  A lot of info on the web places this roaster in the likely to disappoint and bake the beans category so the beans chosen can be lost and will not be missed much.  It took ten minutes but it did roast these beans to an acceptable level and i suspect it would have worked better with more bean mass to slow the movement and build more heat.  

My Poppery I needs more bean mass thanks to a powerful fan which spins a small quantity too fast and the bean mass is cooled by this rapid movement - go over 100g and the roast settles in nice with a slow undulation until they become light and enter a strong first crack. The next roast with the Melitta CBR-10 I think I will go to 55 - 60g beans even though this might exceed the max level by a little bit. I notice too when I work the slide from off to roast the fan speed picks up the closer toward roast the lever is positioned - there is a bit of profiling possible then so more experimentation is warranted.

The resulting beans - 40g like I aimed for - turned out OK as you can see in the photo. They entered first crack without fanfare and the chaff collector worked as advertized to keep the process very clean.  I used a metal bowl to cool the beans and will make a fresh pot early next week with the results. 

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Comments

Submitted by yeahyeah on
Good job, it looks like you pulled off a pretty even roast with that thing.

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>They turned out better than I expected - I will try a nice Panama bean I have next time I roast - I do like not having to go the the garage just to have some roasting fun - i bet this thing isn't very durable though.

Submitted by Chamie on
I'll be waiting to read how they turn out in the end, but they do look pretty good. I learned by trial and error with my little air popper that using more beans usually results in a better roast.

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>considering the extremely small batch size recommendations I expect nailing roasts on this thing will require the aim of a sharpshooter - still these things make me smile.

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>I consider it more of a sample roaster - it is nice on a cold winter day to load up something this compact without leaving the warmth of the home - actually it adds to the warmth of the home as it heats and roasts, but no, I would not want this to be my steady use roaster.

Submitted by jbviau on
Nice. Aside: I have a new plan for your 30-year-old greens: pass them through the digestive tract of a local animal! That should fix them right up.

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>Aged Kopi Kat (the cat isn't going to like this one bit...) - not much could be better than that - I will sell this rare delicacy for a small fortune and retire to the islands. ; )

Submitted by wakeknot on
Those beans look good to me. Who would have believed you could pull that off for $5? Was it hard to hear first crack on the machine?

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>I was a little shocked myself that it worked - the noise is not very bad at all - the cracks can be heard with no problem on the two batches I have roasted so far.

These looks very good. But it probably works best as a roast training tool? 40-50g per session seems like a low amount. Would require many roasts to last you for a week.

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>I envision this being used as a small sample roaster this winter - the Behmor works fine inside the garage but the poppers send chaff everywhere so I only use them outdoors - problem is they do not work as well when it is cold outside so this Melitta CBR-10 with it's chaff collection and low noise/smoke (almost none) came along at a great time.

Submitted by donnedonne on
that's a resonant pun--some people "brew for aroma," especially when it comes to syphon, essentially under-extracting in order to get better aromatics, even if the resulting cup suffers

Submitted by EricBNC on
<br>this is a clever play on words - I like this little piece if coffee roasting history but it likely would not hold up to daily use - who knows though, I might be wrong.

Roasting for Aroma with the Melitta Aroma Roast

| by

Thanks to my Melitta CBR-10 fluid bed 1000 watt personal coffee roaster, fresh coffee is available to me at a moment's notice in 40 gram increments.  That's right, this thing is designed to hold 50 - 55g green coffee maximum capacity which nets a little over 40g of roasted beans.  I aimed for a 40g batch since this is my usual ground coffee volume when making a 20 fl oz pot using the venerable Krups Cafe Prima 4 cup coffee brewer.  This translates into approximately a 14% moisture loss which is what I get with my other roasting methods.

I chose a mediocre Dominican Republic green coffee bean for my first roast - I was not sure if this Melitta would bake the beans or roast them.  A lot of info on the web places this roaster in the likely to disappoint and bake the beans category so the beans chosen can be lost and will not be missed much.  It took ten minutes but it did roast these beans to an acceptable level and i suspect it would have worked better with more bean mass to slow the movement and build more heat.  

My Poppery I needs more bean mass thanks to a powerful fan which spins a small quantity too fast and the bean mass is cooled by this rapid movement - go over 100g and the roast settles in nice with a slow undulation until they become light and enter a strong first crack. The next roast with the Melitta CBR-10 I think I will go to 55 - 60g beans even though this might exceed the max level by a little bit. I notice too when I work the slide from off to roast the fan speed picks up the closer toward roast the lever is positioned - there is a bit of profiling possible then so more experimentation is warranted.

The resulting beans - 40g like I aimed for - turned out OK as you can see in the photo. They entered first crack without fanfare and the chaff collector worked as advertized to keep the process very clean.  I used a metal bowl to cool the beans and will make a fresh pot early next week with the results. 

Category: BLOG

@broseph

April 19, 2012 | by EricBNC


this is a clever play on words - I like this little piece if coffee roasting history but it likely would not hold up to daily use - who knows though, I might be wrong.

that's a resonant pun--some

April 10, 2012 | by donnedonne

that's a resonant pun--some people "brew for aroma," especially when it comes to syphon, essentially under-extracting in order to get better aromatics, even if the resulting cup suffers

@sam

December 11, 2011 | by EricBNC


I envision this being used as a small sample roaster this winter - the Behmor works fine inside the garage but the poppers send chaff everywhere so I only use them outdoors - problem is they do not work as well when it is cold outside so this Melitta CBR-10 with it's chaff collection and low noise/smoke (almost none) came along at a great time.

Looking good

December 11, 2011 | by samuellaw178

These looks very good. But it probably works best as a roast training tool? 40-50g per session seems like a low amount. Would require many roasts to last you for a week.

@wakenot

December 6, 2011 | by EricBNC


I was a little shocked myself that it worked - the noise is not very bad at all - the cracks can be heard with no problem on the two batches I have roasted so far.

amazing

December 6, 2011 | by wakeknot

Those beans look good to me. Who would have believed you could pull that off for $5? Was it hard to hear first crack on the machine?

Great Idea

December 5, 2011 | by EricBNC


Aged Kopi Kat (the cat isn't going to like this one bit...) - not much could be better than that - I will sell this rare delicacy for a small fortune and retire to the islands. ; )

It works!

December 4, 2011 | by jbviau

Nice. Aside: I have a new plan for your 30-year-old greens: pass them through the digestive tract of a local animal! That should fix them right up.

Sampler

December 4, 2011 | by EricBNC


I consider it more of a sample roaster - it is nice on a cold winter day to load up something this compact without leaving the warmth of the home - actually it adds to the warmth of the home as it heats and roasts, but no, I would not want this to be my steady use roaster.

Seems like a pretty cool

December 4, 2011 | by intrepid510

Seems like a pretty cool device for the budding home roaster, perhaps not for the experienced one tho.

A fine line

December 4, 2011 | by EricBNC


considering the extremely small batch size recommendations I expect nailing roasts on this thing will require the aim of a sharpshooter - still these things make me smile.

Nice!

December 4, 2011 | by Chamie

I'll be waiting to read how they turn out in the end, but they do look pretty good. I learned by trial and error with my little air popper that using more beans usually results in a better roast.

They turned out better than

December 4, 2011 | by EricBNC


They turned out better than I expected - I will try a nice Panama bean I have next time I roast - I do like not having to go the the garage just to have some roasting fun - i bet this thing isn't very durable though.

Good job

December 4, 2011 | by yeahyeah

Good job, it looks like you pulled off a pretty even roast with that thing.

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