While experimenting with fertilizers, students at a UK boy’s business school found that sprouting pumpkin seeds in coffee grounds instead of their usual manure yielded great results. Besides the pumpkin, a crop of grapes sprouted in the coffee is also doing well. The seeds sown in horse manure did not do that well. Neither the school staff nor the students had an explanation for the success of the coffee grounds as seed germinator, but a commenter to the article stated that it’s the nitrogen in the grounds which do the trick.

 

Coffee grounds have been used for years in composts, which mix a lot of garden waste, grass clippings with water and cow manure if obtainable. The pumpkin seeds not only sprouted well, but the plant thrived so well, it’s now a 16 foot long vine. The article didn’t say anything about the actual fruit, and the picture shows a flower but no pumpkin. It may be the planting was done too late in the year for the pumpkins to be ready for a Halloween harvest. It also might be that the flowers did not get pollinated. Sometimes when bees aren’t around, the pollination has to be done manually. But the vine sure is impressive.

 

If you want to try sprouting pumpkins in coffee grounds, make sure you start early enough in the year to give the pumpkins lots of time to grow. Also, if pollination doesn’t occur naturally by the bees, you’ll need to take a brush and remove pollen from the male flower and brush it into the female flower. Keep composting with coffee ground compost and some great pumpkin fruits should be available to harvest by Halloween.

Source: 
Batley News
Source URL: 
http://www.batleynews.co.uk/news/local/more-batley-news/spooky_veg_grows_on_coffee_1_3869217
News Category: 
Image: 
Coffee Beats Manure as Seed Fertilizer

Comments

Submitted by jbviau on
This is way better than pumpkin-flavored coffee.

Yep plants love it! And best of all a lot of pests so not like coffee grounds so it also helps in that regard, because which would you rather shovel, poop or spent coffee? I choose coffee!

Submitted by EricBNC on

We compost an amazing aount of coffee thanks to my excess - I looked at the grounds bucket after a month and was shocked!

Submitted by Shane (not verified) on
Coffee grounds are an ideal material for preparing seeds, in much the same way that some use clay and vermicast. I have experimented using dried grounds with tomatoes, pumpkin (with the same results BTW), chilli, and a variety of herbs. The smaller seeds are tricky, say anything smaller than broccoli seed, but all worth a try. Anyway - if you want to see more about using coffee grounds in the garden please check out my site dedicated to the topic. http://groundtoground.org

I remembered reading a while ago that these coffee ground compost will make the soil slightly acidic so it's not suitable for every plants. Some caveats apply here I guess. it's probably good for those plants that prefers a slightly acidic environment.

Coffee Beats Manure as Seed Fertilizer

| by

Coffee Beats Manure as Seed Fertilizer

While experimenting with fertilizers, students at a UK boy’s business school found that sprouting pumpkin seeds in coffee grounds instead of their usual manure yielded great results. Besides the pumpkin, a crop of grapes sprouted in the coffee is also doing well. The seeds sown in horse manure did not do that well. Neither the school staff nor the students had an explanation for the success of the coffee grounds as seed germinator, but a commenter to the article stated that it’s the nitrogen in the grounds which do the trick.

 

Coffee grounds have been used for years in composts, which mix a lot of garden waste, grass clippings with water and cow manure if obtainable. The pumpkin seeds not only sprouted well, but the plant thrived so well, it’s now a 16 foot long vine. The article didn’t say anything about the actual fruit, and the picture shows a flower but no pumpkin. It may be the planting was done too late in the year for the pumpkins to be ready for a Halloween harvest. It also might be that the flowers did not get pollinated. Sometimes when bees aren’t around, the pollination has to be done manually. But the vine sure is impressive.

 

If you want to try sprouting pumpkins in coffee grounds, make sure you start early enough in the year to give the pumpkins lots of time to grow. Also, if pollination doesn’t occur naturally by the bees, you’ll need to take a brush and remove pollen from the male flower and brush it into the female flower. Keep composting with coffee ground compost and some great pumpkin fruits should be available to harvest by Halloween.

Source: Batley News http://www.batleynews.co.uk/news/local/more-batley-news/spooky_veg_grows_on_coffee_1_3869217

Category: NEWS

I heard that they make the soil slightly acidic

November 12, 2011 | by samuellaw178

I remembered reading a while ago that these coffee ground compost will make the soil slightly acidic so it's not suitable for every plants. Some caveats apply here I guess. it's probably good for those plants that prefers a slightly acidic environment.

Re: Coffee Beats Manure as Seed Fertilizer

October 20, 2011 | by caffeine65

I was thinking of trying to grow plants indoors (to counteract the winter blahs). Will try using your formula and see how ti turns out. Thanks for the suggestion. :)

Grounds Fertilizer

October 19, 2011 | by Shane

Coffee grounds are an ideal material for preparing seeds, in much the same way that some use clay and vermicast. I have experimented using dried grounds with tomatoes, pumpkin (with the same results BTW), chilli, and a variety of herbs. The smaller seeds are tricky, say anything smaller than broccoli seed, but all worth a try. Anyway - if you want to see more about using coffee grounds in the garden please check out my site dedicated to the topic. http://groundtoground.org

Hah, it's good to hear

October 19, 2011 | by Karrde

Hah, it's good to hear something that my coffee buying can give back to the environment after the last few blog posts explaining how bad it was for the environment.

Full of it

October 19, 2011 | by EricBNC


We compost an amazing aount of coffee thanks to my excess - I looked at the grounds bucket after a month and was shocked!

what a bonus

October 19, 2011 | by wakeknot

coffee grounds smell better than manure, too.

Yep plants love it! And best

October 19, 2011 | by intrepid510

Yep plants love it! And best of all a lot of pests so not like coffee grounds so it also helps in that regard, because which would you rather shovel, poop or spent coffee? I choose coffee!

Fun

October 19, 2011 | by jbviau

This is way better than pumpkin-flavored coffee.

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