It’s not that large a country, but Ethiopia has a diverse climate system, according to recent reports. The coffee producing nation either has a drought or it doesn’t, depending on who you believe. In the mountains the coffee is looking good, but in the plains to the south, farmers say a drought has ruined this year’s crop. The Guardian (UK) reports this week that a lack of rain in Ethiopia’s south has put a halt to coffee production, to the extent that some farmers were forced to “rip out their trees”. Other trees have shriveled up and died.

 

The dire reports are coming from an NGO that helps children and families. There are five affected areas in the south, according to this report. Some confirmation does come from another report that 1.3 million Ethiopians required food aid earlier this summer. On the other hand, a representative from a coffee exporter in Addis Ababa reports that those areas are not important coffee producers. The mountainous areas are doing fine, and though late, this year’s crop from the mountains is predicted to be one of the best ever.

 

She goes on to say that the entire country received rain during the rainy season. Production reports just in show that September’s exported amount was up from the same period last year. As coffee consumers, and especially fans of Ethiopia’s Yirgacheffee and Sidamo varieties, it’s too early to be concerned. But such contradictions in reports are a little troublesome. One group, CTA Agritrade, has suggested a far-ranging program of help to the farmers in terms of building up all the areas in the coffee production chain, from tree health to marketing. One item left off the list was water, which seems crucial. Though land-locked, Ethiopia does have access to a port. Therefore, one area to explore would be working with neighboring countries, also drought impacted, to build a desalination plant in the Red Sea. Whatever the situation of this season’s crop, it does appear there’s lots of room for improvement in Ethiopian coffee production/infrastructure. Since a quarter of the nation’s people are involved in coffee production, some improvements to the industry would greatly impact all Ethiopians for the better.

Source: 
The Guardian online
Source URL: 
http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2011/oct/04/drought-ethiopia-coffee-climate-change-cocoa
News Category: 
Image: 
Ethiopian Coffee: Drought or Not?

Comments

Submitted by EricBNC on

I hope they can get together and solve the water shortage. On a side note, not many consider this season's Ethiopians to be outstanding - maybe this drought is why.

Submitted by kaddis (not verified) on
As an Ethiopian, I appreciate your concern. The Guardian and most UK based media are used to reporting disaster about Ethiopia. They are craving for one this year - starting from land grab, aid food & politics and now coffee. I am telling you these medias are losing their audience to Aljazeera - that is why they are becoming so desperate about bad news. And fortunately for Eth and Unfortunately for BBC, Guradian, Irish times...- the current drought in Eth is being handled better in Eth - not reaching famine stage. As for water - we actualy have more water than needed to the extent resulting high level of degradation. So we need to work and be supported in keeping the greenary intact. No destilation even for Djibouti or Somalia - we can share. best, Kaddis

Submitted by Kiros Girmay (not verified) on
I think the government supporters don't want to hear the truth. Yes, in Ethiopia food aid is used for political gain by the government in all parts of Ethiopia. This is fact. So BBC reported this correctly. The Meles regime (Ethiopian current government) only wants a report that supports their propaganda. Hey, Wake up and realize that nothing can be hidden in the 21st century.

Submitted by wakeknot on
Kaddis it is very cool to hear from an Ethiopian on here. Glad you don't think it is nearly as bad as being reported.

Kaddis, I hope you're right. It does seem like these newspapers want something to report about. Not only that is it means I get to enjoy your country's excellent coffee. However, the weird part about drinking coffee is that most of it is grown in poor countries and drank by the rich countries. We need to get the prices right so all can benefit, and there can be better infrastructure so one year with less than perfect rainfall won't impact production very much.

Ethiopian Coffee: Drought or Not?

| by

Ethiopian Coffee: Drought or Not?

It’s not that large a country, but Ethiopia has a diverse climate system, according to recent reports. The coffee producing nation either has a drought or it doesn’t, depending on who you believe. In the mountains the coffee is looking good, but in the plains to the south, farmers say a drought has ruined this year’s crop. The Guardian (UK) reports this week that a lack of rain in Ethiopia’s south has put a halt to coffee production, to the extent that some farmers were forced to “rip out their trees”. Other trees have shriveled up and died.

 

The dire reports are coming from an NGO that helps children and families. There are five affected areas in the south, according to this report. Some confirmation does come from another report that 1.3 million Ethiopians required food aid earlier this summer. On the other hand, a representative from a coffee exporter in Addis Ababa reports that those areas are not important coffee producers. The mountainous areas are doing fine, and though late, this year’s crop from the mountains is predicted to be one of the best ever.

 

She goes on to say that the entire country received rain during the rainy season. Production reports just in show that September’s exported amount was up from the same period last year. As coffee consumers, and especially fans of Ethiopia’s Yirgacheffee and Sidamo varieties, it’s too early to be concerned. But such contradictions in reports are a little troublesome. One group, CTA Agritrade, has suggested a far-ranging program of help to the farmers in terms of building up all the areas in the coffee production chain, from tree health to marketing. One item left off the list was water, which seems crucial. Though land-locked, Ethiopia does have access to a port. Therefore, one area to explore would be working with neighboring countries, also drought impacted, to build a desalination plant in the Red Sea. Whatever the situation of this season’s crop, it does appear there’s lots of room for improvement in Ethiopian coffee production/infrastructure. Since a quarter of the nation’s people are involved in coffee production, some improvements to the industry would greatly impact all Ethiopians for the better.

Source: The Guardian online http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2011/oct/04/drought-ethiopia-coffee-climate-change-cocoa

Category: NEWS

Kaddis, I hope you're right.

October 15, 2011 | by intrepid510

Kaddis, I hope you're right. It does seem like these newspapers want something to report about. Not only that is it means I get to enjoy your country's excellent coffee. However, the weird part about drinking coffee is that most of it is grown in poor countries and drank by the rich countries. We need to get the prices right so all can benefit, and there can be better infrastructure so one year with less than perfect rainfall won't impact production very much.

from the source

October 7, 2011 | by wakeknot

Kaddis it is very cool to hear from an Ethiopian on here. Glad you don't think it is nearly as bad as being reported.

Drought

October 7, 2011 | by Kiros Girmay

I think the government supporters don't want to hear the truth. Yes, in Ethiopia food aid is used for political gain by the government in all parts of Ethiopia. This is fact. So BBC reported this correctly. The Meles regime (Ethiopian current government) only wants a report that supports their propaganda. Hey, Wake up and realize that nothing can be hidden in the 21st century.

Fair enough

October 7, 2011 | by kaddis

As an Ethiopian, I appreciate your concern. The Guardian and most UK based media are used to reporting disaster about Ethiopia. They are craving for one this year - starting from land grab, aid food & politics and now coffee. I am telling you these medias are losing their audience to Aljazeera - that is why they are becoming so desperate about bad news. And fortunately for Eth and Unfortunately for BBC, Guradian, Irish times...- the current drought in Eth is being handled better in Eth - not reaching famine stage. As for water - we actualy have more water than needed to the extent resulting high level of degradation. So we need to work and be supported in keeping the greenary intact. No destilation even for Djibouti or Somalia - we can share. best, Kaddis

Wondering aloud

October 7, 2011 | by jbviau

How much water does a coffee tree require?

Water for Ethiopia

October 6, 2011 | by EricBNC


I hope they can get together and solve the water shortage. On a side note, not many consider this season's Ethiopians to be outstanding - maybe this drought is why.

ethiopian? meh. kenya for

October 6, 2011 | by donnedonne

ethiopian? meh. kenya for me.

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