Hurricane Irene wreaked havoc on the East coast two weeks ago, causing problems for coffee drinkers. The under-reported story deals with how some folks were forced to undergo caffeine withdrawal during the power outages. Reporter Tracy Beckerman was one of those, writing about her predicament in her local New York state paper. Tracy recalls how her family had planned for an emergency by stocking up on bottled water, six ice-filled coolers to preserve the food from the fridge, and a multitude of batteries. However, she neglected to consider the coffee maker, of which she had a grand total of ten! “Hey, some women buy shoes. I buy coffee makers”, she writes. It wasn’t until the actual power outage occurred that she realized not one of them was non-electric – they all required a working power outlet, without which they just looked nice, but were worthless. Even with ten pots, she lacked a French press. Not being an instant coffee drinker, Beckerman couldn’t even make that substitute. With the roads blocked by trees, she remained coffee-less until the next day, when thankfully power was restored and she was able to brew her large pot. She didn’t say whether or not she would get a French press to have on hand for the next emergency. She had stated that before the outage, eleven coffee makers was a little over the top. Why would a French press have saved her from coffee withdrawal during a power outage? If she’d had a gas burner or even an alcohol burner, she could have heated water for the press and enjoyed good coffee. What she didn’t consider, however, is that she still could have made an iced coffee. Any glass jar can be filled with water, ice and coffee grounds. After the grounds steep for a few hours, most any kind of filter will work to strain them out, or, without a filter, one can just pour the brewed coffee from the top, being careful to keep the grounds on the bottom of the jar. Even though cold brew might not have appealed to her during the storm, at least it would have provided some kind of coffee. Better than a French press in a power outage is a tabletop brewer which works with an alcohol burner and makes coffee anywhere without hot water or electricity. Brew on, powerlessly!

Source: 
Mahopac News online
Source URL: 
http://www.mahopacnews.com/Articles-c-2011-09-07-209456.112113-No-coffee-and-no-caffeine-make-Tracy-go-crazy.html
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Comments

Submitted by jbviau on
Our power went out for 3 days during Irene. We have a gas stove, so I could heat water, but the problem was that without electricity I had no way to *grind* my coffee. I made do by emptying coffee pods (full of ground coffee) into my Clever dripper, but I was kicking myself the whole time for having sold my Hario Skerton a few months ago! One of these days I'll buy another manual grinder.

Submitted by EricBNC on

I keep an old kerosene stove serviced and ready in the garage that has a flat top designed to hold a pot or a kettle. If I have water, I will have coffee - hand grinder at the ready too!

Submitted by Tracy Beckerman (not verified) on
Thanks so much for the coffee info. It's good to know that I am coffee-prepared for the next natural disaster... although the "waiting a few hours for it to brew "concept might not sit well with my "need it now" mentality.

Submitted by wakeknot on
that will be my catch if the power goes out. One more reason to pick up a hand grinder!

Hurricane Irene Knocks Out Coffee Prep – What To Do?

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Hurricane Irene wreaked havoc on the East coast two weeks ago, causing problems for coffee drinkers. The under-reported story deals with how some folks were forced to undergo caffeine withdrawal during the power outages. Reporter Tracy Beckerman was one of those, writing about her predicament in her local New York state paper. Tracy recalls how her family had planned for an emergency by stocking up on bottled water, six ice-filled coolers to preserve the food from the fridge, and a multitude of batteries. However, she neglected to consider the coffee maker, of which she had a grand total of ten! “Hey, some women buy shoes. I buy coffee makers”, she writes. It wasn’t until the actual power outage occurred that she realized not one of them was non-electric – they all required a working power outlet, without which they just looked nice, but were worthless. Even with ten pots, she lacked a French press. Not being an instant coffee drinker, Beckerman couldn’t even make that substitute. With the roads blocked by trees, she remained coffee-less until the next day, when thankfully power was restored and she was able to brew her large pot. She didn’t say whether or not she would get a French press to have on hand for the next emergency. She had stated that before the outage, eleven coffee makers was a little over the top. Why would a French press have saved her from coffee withdrawal during a power outage? If she’d had a gas burner or even an alcohol burner, she could have heated water for the press and enjoyed good coffee. What she didn’t consider, however, is that she still could have made an iced coffee. Any glass jar can be filled with water, ice and coffee grounds. After the grounds steep for a few hours, most any kind of filter will work to strain them out, or, without a filter, one can just pour the brewed coffee from the top, being careful to keep the grounds on the bottom of the jar. Even though cold brew might not have appealed to her during the storm, at least it would have provided some kind of coffee. Better than a French press in a power outage is a tabletop brewer which works with an alcohol burner and makes coffee anywhere without hot water or electricity. Brew on, powerlessly!

Source: Mahopac News online http://www.mahopacnews.com/Articles-c-2011-09-07-209456.112113-No-coffee-and-no-caffeine-make-Tracy-go-crazy.html

Category: NEWS

I need to add a hand grinder

October 23, 2011 | by intrepid510

I need to add a hand grinder to my kit!

grinding

October 10, 2011 | by wakeknot

that will be my catch if the power goes out. One more reason to pick up a hand grinder!

my coffee artilce

September 11, 2011 | by Tracy Beckerman

Thanks so much for the coffee info. It's good to know that I am coffee-prepared for the next natural disaster... although the "waiting a few hours for it to brew "concept might not sit well with my "need it now" mentality.

Tough times

September 11, 2011 | by EricBNC


I keep an old kerosene stove serviced and ready in the garage that has a flat top designed to hold a pot or a kettle. If I have water, I will have coffee - hand grinder at the ready too!

Can totally relate

September 10, 2011 | by jbviau

Our power went out for 3 days during Irene. We have a gas stove, so I could heat water, but the problem was that without electricity I had no way to *grind* my coffee. I made do by emptying coffee pods (full of ground coffee) into my Clever dripper, but I was kicking myself the whole time for having sold my Hario Skerton a few months ago! One of these days I'll buy another manual grinder.

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