Even with all of the variables involved in estimating the price per cup of home brewed coffee, it’s pretty much a sure thing that whatever brand of coffee you buy, even high-end, brewing your own at home is cheaper than the coffee shop or fast food place. Whitson Gordon has done some of the math for us and found quite a savings. Gordon’s research determined that a typical coffee chain coffee in a 16 oz. size averages between two and five dollars.

 

An average value for high-end coffee purchased off the shelf is about 39 cents per ounce. That ounce is about what you need for that 16 oz. cup. By factoring the costs of water, electricity, a coffee pot and cup (prorated over time), his source came out with a grand total of 44 cents per cup. So the conclusion of the matter is that you stand to save from $1.50 up to $4.50 per cup. There is a lot of leeway there, all depending on where that grande is purchased. Of course, this is in regard to black coffee only.

 

Factor in some milk for cappuccino, and maybe the price of the home brewed cup jumps to a dollar. You’ve still saved more than a dollar a cup, a savings that adds up quickly over time, even if you’re only buying one cup a day at a coffee shop. If you save a dollar a day, it won’t be long before you can purchase an upgraded coffee maker, even an espresso machine. But that’s not the whole story. Compare the quality of home verses shop while you’re at it. Where else but at home can you have the variety of coffees?

 

And as Gordon pointed out, the time involved in brewing doesn’t have to be but a few minutes a day. Do the math for yourself. Determine the cost per ounce of your own coffee and figure out how much you’re using per cup of brewed coffee, the way YOU like it. You know how much that 16-ouncer is where you stop for your daily cup. How much can YOU save?

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http://lifehacker.com/5856593/how-much-youll-actually-save-by-making-your-own-coffee?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=pulsenews
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Making Coffee at Home Does Save Money

Comments

Submitted by yeahyeah on
I do coffee at home for the quality and the convenience. I tend to drink a lot more coffee now than I did when I would go out for coffee, so that erases a lot of the savings.

Submitted by EricBNC on

Making coffee at home is a good way to save money and get great coffee too.

Submitted by jbviau on
Coffee I brew at home is absolutely better and somewhat cheaper. Plus, I already have free wifi. ;)

Submitted by wakeknot on
this is why buying coffee through roaste is such a steal.

For someone that buys coffee everyday, I really can see that making coffee on your own will save a huge amount in the long run. Probably enough to buy a Speedster! :-P But for me, I normally don't drink coffee, maybe 1-2 cups per month. But since I make my own coffee, I increased my coffee consumption by a huge margin and thus increasing the cost. It's probably not the best way to save money though. But I have no complaint, because I enjoyed every last bit of it. ;-) The satisfaction you get from home brewing is nothing money can buy.

Submitted by caffeine65 on
When I was working I tried to make the coffee at home but invariably ran into trouble. I would forget to set the coffee maker the night before and would run out of time or get the coffee cravings around lunch time so I would have to run out and get a cup. Or when I was working at a seasonal job (there was a coffee place inside the store) it was too tempting to not go there on break or lunch.

Making Coffee at Home Does Save Money

| by

Making Coffee at Home Does Save Money

Even with all of the variables involved in estimating the price per cup of home brewed coffee, it’s pretty much a sure thing that whatever brand of coffee you buy, even high-end, brewing your own at home is cheaper than the coffee shop or fast food place. Whitson Gordon has done some of the math for us and found quite a savings. Gordon’s research determined that a typical coffee chain coffee in a 16 oz. size averages between two and five dollars.

 

An average value for high-end coffee purchased off the shelf is about 39 cents per ounce. That ounce is about what you need for that 16 oz. cup. By factoring the costs of water, electricity, a coffee pot and cup (prorated over time), his source came out with a grand total of 44 cents per cup. So the conclusion of the matter is that you stand to save from $1.50 up to $4.50 per cup. There is a lot of leeway there, all depending on where that grande is purchased. Of course, this is in regard to black coffee only.

 

Factor in some milk for cappuccino, and maybe the price of the home brewed cup jumps to a dollar. You’ve still saved more than a dollar a cup, a savings that adds up quickly over time, even if you’re only buying one cup a day at a coffee shop. If you save a dollar a day, it won’t be long before you can purchase an upgraded coffee maker, even an espresso machine. But that’s not the whole story. Compare the quality of home verses shop while you’re at it. Where else but at home can you have the variety of coffees?

 

And as Gordon pointed out, the time involved in brewing doesn’t have to be but a few minutes a day. Do the math for yourself. Determine the cost per ounce of your own coffee and figure out how much you’re using per cup of brewed coffee, the way YOU like it. You know how much that 16-ouncer is where you stop for your daily cup. How much can YOU save?

Source: Lifehacker.com http://lifehacker.com/5856593/how-much-youll-actually-save-by-making-your-own-coffee?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=pulsenews

Category: NEWS
Tags: Brewing

coffee at home

November 9, 2011 | by caffeine65

When I was working I tried to make the coffee at home but invariably ran into trouble. I would forget to set the coffee maker the night before and would run out of time or get the coffee cravings around lunch time so I would have to run out and get a cup. Or when I was working at a seasonal job (there was a coffee place inside the store) it was too tempting to not go there on break or lunch.

It's true in some cases, but not all

November 8, 2011 | by samuellaw178

For someone that buys coffee everyday, I really can see that making coffee on your own will save a huge amount in the long run. Probably enough to buy a Speedster! :-P But for me, I normally don't drink coffee, maybe 1-2 cups per month. But since I make my own coffee, I increased my coffee consumption by a huge margin and thus increasing the cost. It's probably not the best way to save money though. But I have no complaint, because I enjoyed every last bit of it. ;-) The satisfaction you get from home brewing is nothing money can buy.

I posted my own figures on

November 7, 2011 | by Karrde

I posted my own figures on my blog, I think he's lowballing the numbers quite a bit for most of us here by using grocery store coffee. Overall, you do save money though.

I think you drink more

November 7, 2011 | by intrepid510

I think you drink more coffee at home than out, so it evens it out. However, is more of a good thing bad? probably not.

agreed

November 7, 2011 | by wakeknot

this is why buying coffee through roaste is such a steal.

Quality

November 7, 2011 | by jbviau

Coffee I brew at home is absolutely better and somewhat cheaper. Plus, I already have free wifi. ;)

it does say money, but there

November 7, 2011 | by donnedonne

it does say money, but there are cons

Agreed

November 6, 2011 | by EricBNC


Making coffee at home is a good way to save money and get great coffee too.

Cost

November 6, 2011 | by yeahyeah

I do coffee at home for the quality and the convenience. I tend to drink a lot more coffee now than I did when I would go out for coffee, so that erases a lot of the savings.

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