There’s just no understanding some people. Every day it seems the news comes out about another health benefit of coffee. But even so, there are the occasional writers who either ignore those announcements or discount them, and then offer the opposite point of view and build a case for avoiding coffee. Astrid Bidanec is one of those writers who has a grievance against coffee. Everyone has a right to an opinion of course, a point she made herself. Opinions are one thing but facts are quite another. Her points against coffee can be refuted or at least questioned, and opinion has nothing to do with it.

 

Her first complaint is that Americans spend too much money on coffee, using the example of a $5 Starbucks drink. Since caffeine is classified as a stimulant, it creates a physical dependency and leads to more expensive coffees. While it helps the economy it is detrimental to health. Well, it might be so if all of the 400 million cups of coffee consumed daily cost $5 a pop, but many brew their own at much less cost.

 

Another complaint is that caffeine in coffee leads to weight gain, as appetite is stimulated once the caffeine high wears off. This contradicts the experience of many coffee drinkers who drink it to help them lose weight. She doesn’t give a source for these statements, but goes on to state that it’s almost impossible to maintain a healthy eating schedule with all the food cravings caused by coffee. Plus all the sugar and creamer we use… many drink their coffee black, and others may use less fattening additions than creamer.

 

Astrid also doesn’t like the caffeine crash that follows the caffeine high. Coffee does not have to cause these highs and lows. Most coffee drinkers reach a plateau where, if they drink the same amount every day, their body adjusts and the caffeine no longer affects them to such extremes. The same pattern applies to withdrawal headaches. Mostly those who have a greater consumption of coffee suffer from withdrawal headaches. As long as people drink coffee in moderate amounts, say less than four big cups a day, they should be able to avoid these kinds of extremes. All coffee drinkers will have their own opinions about Astrid’s points. Since opinions should be backed up by facts, know your facts. And brew on, knowingly.

Source: 
The Examiner online
Source URL: 
http://www.examiner.com/fitness-weight-loss-101-in-national/3-reasons-to-skip-coffee-to-improve-your-health
News Category: 
Image: 
What Is It About Coffee Astrid Doesn’t Like?

Comments

I think there are some people out there that just want to make a name for themselves by attacking something that so many people drink everyday and what better way than to attack coffee. Personally, I do think a person can go over board, as long as you drink it moderation you'll be fine!

Submitted by EricBNC on

She creates a scenario that doesn't exist - solving problems that are not there just to make herself seem in the know to somebody.

Submitted by wakeknot on
If not it is hard to think of why she would write this stuff. She doesn't like it, that is fine, but why shouldn't others? Her reasons seem weak at best.

Submitted by jbviau on
The site is full of self-proclaimed experts blogging for $$ and paid according to page views IIRC. It's in their interest to be outlandish/extreme.

Submitted by David Caras (not verified) on
I post this only as a counterpoint, not an argument, but please be advised..... As a roaster and contributer to articales about coffee, you already have an automtaic agenda. that is understandable an appropriate. A person SHOULD defend their beliefs and passions. However, to make a stronger argument, instead of just decalring Astrid's article wrong and unresearch, will you provide authentic references and citations to PROVE her information incorrect, please? Perhaps that will squelch this "brewing" coffee battle. Instead of "chest poking", perhaps you can use your own idea of providing factual research. Thank you.

Submitted by David Caras (not verified) on
I must repost, because my bad spelling and grammar was eating at my soul. LOLOL! I post this only as a counterpoint, not an argument, but please be advised..... As a roaster and contributor to articles about coffee, you already have an automatic agenda. That is understandable an appropriate. A person SHOULD defend their beliefs and passions. However, to make a stronger argument, instead of just declaring Astrid's article wrong and un-researched, will you provide authentic references and citations to PROVE her information incorrect, please? Perhaps that will squelch this "brewing" coffee battle. Instead of "chest poking", perhaps you can use your own idea of providing factual research. Thank you.

Submitted by caffeine65 on
I looked on Astrid's website and see a lot of product endorsements. Maybe she does not like coffee because it will interfere with the other endorsements or something.

Submitted by sherman8r on
Here are some facts from internet to support commentary. RE: 1. % who brew their own coffee at home From the National Coffee Assn, 2009: “Even as coffee retains its resiliency among consumers, coffee preparation at home is up 5 percentage points with 83% of past-day coffee drinkers reporting that they made coffee at home the day before, and 80% of past-week coffee drinkers doing so during the previous week.” 2010 - 86% of previous-day coffee drinkers reporting that they made coffee at home. 2. Does coffee lead to weight gain? After an admittedly quick search, I couldn’t find any discussion that made the claims Astrid did. Yes, there can be weight gain if too much coffee is consumed resulting in thyroid harm. But the outlandish claims of Astrid cannot be verified. Then this from pharmacology site: "Many central stimulants reduce appetite, via mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Caffeine appears to have a small reducing effect on caloric intake (Tremblay et al., 1988; Racotta et al., 1994;Comer et al., 1997). This effect is similar to, although less marked than, that seen after amphetamine (Foltin et al., 1995). For both stimulant drugs the effect is on the number of meals consumed rather than on meal size." What % use sugar and creamer? 35% drink it black, so 65% add some kind of sweetener or creamer, but these are not detailed. The onus is on Astrid to prove her points; the confirmation of her statements is not readily available on the web. 3. Caffeine highs lead to lows and fatigue This might be true if one abuses coffee and drinks a very large amount. Tolerance of caffeine:" It is known that tolerance develops to some, but not to all effects of caffeine in humans and experimental animals (Robertson et al., 1981; Holtzman and Finn, 1988). The precise mechanism underlying these effects is not known." (Pharmacology site) 4. Headaches:" in high but not in low caffeine consumers, abstinence was followed by marked increases of blood flow in the frontal lobes." i.e. headaches (Pharmacology site)

I think all the claims that she made, were using Starbucks as the standard for coffee. In Starbucks, yes, it's $5 a pop. It's loaded with creamers and sugars and that a venti coffee there probably contributes a day worth of calories. I personally think that coffee in Starbucks shouldn't be considered the real coffee as they are no more than milk flavored with coffee. Milk and sugars for the most part; coffee, only in the name.

What Is It About Coffee Astrid Doesn’t Like?

| by

What Is It About Coffee Astrid Doesn’t Like?

There’s just no understanding some people. Every day it seems the news comes out about another health benefit of coffee. But even so, there are the occasional writers who either ignore those announcements or discount them, and then offer the opposite point of view and build a case for avoiding coffee. Astrid Bidanec is one of those writers who has a grievance against coffee. Everyone has a right to an opinion of course, a point she made herself. Opinions are one thing but facts are quite another. Her points against coffee can be refuted or at least questioned, and opinion has nothing to do with it.

 

Her first complaint is that Americans spend too much money on coffee, using the example of a $5 Starbucks drink. Since caffeine is classified as a stimulant, it creates a physical dependency and leads to more expensive coffees. While it helps the economy it is detrimental to health. Well, it might be so if all of the 400 million cups of coffee consumed daily cost $5 a pop, but many brew their own at much less cost.

 

Another complaint is that caffeine in coffee leads to weight gain, as appetite is stimulated once the caffeine high wears off. This contradicts the experience of many coffee drinkers who drink it to help them lose weight. She doesn’t give a source for these statements, but goes on to state that it’s almost impossible to maintain a healthy eating schedule with all the food cravings caused by coffee. Plus all the sugar and creamer we use… many drink their coffee black, and others may use less fattening additions than creamer.

 

Astrid also doesn’t like the caffeine crash that follows the caffeine high. Coffee does not have to cause these highs and lows. Most coffee drinkers reach a plateau where, if they drink the same amount every day, their body adjusts and the caffeine no longer affects them to such extremes. The same pattern applies to withdrawal headaches. Mostly those who have a greater consumption of coffee suffer from withdrawal headaches. As long as people drink coffee in moderate amounts, say less than four big cups a day, they should be able to avoid these kinds of extremes. All coffee drinkers will have their own opinions about Astrid’s points. Since opinions should be backed up by facts, know your facts. And brew on, knowingly.

Source: The Examiner online http://www.examiner.com/fitness-weight-loss-101-in-national/3-reasons-to-skip-coffee-to-improve-your-health

Category: NEWS

Her coffee=Starbucks

November 13, 2011 | by samuellaw178

I think all the claims that she made, were using Starbucks as the standard for coffee. In Starbucks, yes, it's $5 a pop. It's loaded with creamers and sugars and that a venti coffee there probably contributes a day worth of calories. I personally think that coffee in Starbucks shouldn't be considered the real coffee as they are no more than milk flavored with coffee. Milk and sugars for the most part; coffee, only in the name.

Re: Coffee Wars from David Carras

October 17, 2011 | by sherman8r

Here are some facts from internet to support commentary. RE: 1. % who brew their own coffee at home From the National Coffee Assn, 2009: “Even as coffee retains its resiliency among consumers, coffee preparation at home is up 5 percentage points with 83% of past-day coffee drinkers reporting that they made coffee at home the day before, and 80% of past-week coffee drinkers doing so during the previous week.” 2010 - 86% of previous-day coffee drinkers reporting that they made coffee at home. 2. Does coffee lead to weight gain? After an admittedly quick search, I couldn’t find any discussion that made the claims Astrid did. Yes, there can be weight gain if too much coffee is consumed resulting in thyroid harm. But the outlandish claims of Astrid cannot be verified. Then this from pharmacology site: "Many central stimulants reduce appetite, via mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Caffeine appears to have a small reducing effect on caloric intake (Tremblay et al., 1988; Racotta et al., 1994;Comer et al., 1997). This effect is similar to, although less marked than, that seen after amphetamine (Foltin et al., 1995). For both stimulant drugs the effect is on the number of meals consumed rather than on meal size." What % use sugar and creamer? 35% drink it black, so 65% add some kind of sweetener or creamer, but these are not detailed. The onus is on Astrid to prove her points; the confirmation of her statements is not readily available on the web. 3. Caffeine highs lead to lows and fatigue This might be true if one abuses coffee and drinks a very large amount. Tolerance of caffeine:" It is known that tolerance develops to some, but not to all effects of caffeine in humans and experimental animals (Robertson et al., 1981; Holtzman and Finn, 1988). The precise mechanism underlying these effects is not known." (Pharmacology site) 4. Headaches:" in high but not in low caffeine consumers, abstinence was followed by marked increases of blood flow in the frontal lobes." i.e. headaches (Pharmacology site)

Astrid

October 17, 2011 | by caffeine65

I looked on Astrid's website and see a lot of product endorsements. Maybe she does not like coffee because it will interfere with the other endorsements or something.

Bad Grammar

October 17, 2011 | by David Caras

I must repost, because my bad spelling and grammar was eating at my soul. LOLOL! I post this only as a counterpoint, not an argument, but please be advised..... As a roaster and contributor to articles about coffee, you already have an automatic agenda. That is understandable an appropriate. A person SHOULD defend their beliefs and passions. However, to make a stronger argument, instead of just declaring Astrid's article wrong and un-researched, will you provide authentic references and citations to PROVE her information incorrect, please? Perhaps that will squelch this "brewing" coffee battle. Instead of "chest poking", perhaps you can use your own idea of providing factual research. Thank you.

Coffee War

October 17, 2011 | by David Caras

I post this only as a counterpoint, not an argument, but please be advised..... As a roaster and contributer to articales about coffee, you already have an automtaic agenda. that is understandable an appropriate. A person SHOULD defend their beliefs and passions. However, to make a stronger argument, instead of just decalring Astrid's article wrong and unresearch, will you provide authentic references and citations to PROVE her information incorrect, please? Perhaps that will squelch this "brewing" coffee battle. Instead of "chest poking", perhaps you can use your own idea of providing factual research. Thank you.

I think there's something to

October 17, 2011 | by Karrde

I think there's something to be said for health detriments who overindulge in coffee, but within moderation I don't think there are any health issues associated with it.

Faulty facts

October 17, 2011 | by EricBNC


She creates a scenario that doesn't exist - solving problems that are not there just to make herself seem in the know to somebody.

"Examiners" are a dime a dozen

October 16, 2011 | by jbviau

The site is full of self-proclaimed experts blogging for $$ and paid according to page views IIRC. It's in their interest to be outlandish/extreme.

desperate for a story?

October 16, 2011 | by wakeknot

If not it is hard to think of why she would write this stuff. She doesn't like it, that is fine, but why shouldn't others? Her reasons seem weak at best.

Some people just like to argue.

October 16, 2011 | by intrepid510

I think there are some people out there that just want to make a name for themselves by attacking something that so many people drink everyday and what better way than to attack coffee. Personally, I do think a person can go over board, as long as you drink it moderation you'll be fine!

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